US 'Ferguson effect': 72% of U.S. cops reluctant to make stops

21:35  11 january  2017
21:35  11 january  2017 Source:   USA TODAY

NYC saw historically low number of shootings in 2016

  NYC saw historically low number of shootings in 2016 The city ended 2016 with just under 1,000 shooting incidents — a historic low mark that Police Commissioner James O’Neill predicted last month. By the time the ball dropped in Times Square on Saturday night, the NYPD had investigated 998 shootings, according to preliminary statistics.

Law enforcement officers are more reluctant to use force, even when it' s appropriate, and less willing to stop Some experts have pointed to a " Ferguson effect " making officers less likely to use force, and this 72 percent said they were less willing to stop and question people who seemed suspicious.

“I think you'll see, you know, the rise in murders in 30 cities, that' s the so-called Ferguson effect where cops are less reluctant to engage in proactive policing,” said Kelly during an appearance on MSNBC' s "Morning Joe." "Certainly that' s an issue here in New York." “And with the advent of cameras, which I ultimately support, but cameras are going to make police officers hesitate somewhat. In some people' s minds, that' s good.

People raise their arms while chanting, © Joe Raedle/Getty Images People raise their arms while chanting, "Hands up, don't shoot", as they stand near where St. Louis police say officers shot and killed a 23-year-old man who was wielding a knife and refused to drop it on Tuesday, August 19, 2014, in St Louis, Missouri. Violent outbreaks have taken place in nearby Ferguson since the shooting death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer on August 9. More than three-quarters of U.S. law enforcement officers say they are reluctant to use force when necessary, and nearly as many say they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem suspicious as a result of increased scrutiny of police, according to a new study published Wednesday by the Pew Research Center.

How teens and Boston cops are finding common ground

  How teens and Boston cops are finding common ground With the help of Teen Empowerment in Dorchester, youth are now part of the solution in helping reduce crimeDespite having a history of racial tension, Boston has avoided crises like we’ve seen in other places, from Ferguson to Baltimore and Dallas.

The so-called " Ferguson effect " - officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be Andrew Cuomo' s assertion that New York will be able to make up for lost electricity generation after - 72 percent said they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem

The so-called " Ferguson effect " - officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be Andrew Cuomo' s assertion that New York will be able to make up for lost electricity generation after - 72 percent said they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem

The 2014 officer-involved shooting death of a black teen in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson put the national spotlight on police use of force and officers' interactions with minorities. Since then, top-ranking law enforcement officers and policymakers have debated the impact of the so-called “Ferguson effect” — officers becoming less proactive in their policing out of a fear their actions will be second-guessed by their superiors and the public.

The wide-ranging, national survey — which includes feedback from 8,000 officers and sheriff’s deputies — quantifies just how pervasive the issue has become in departments across the U.S. in the aftermath of a series of controversial deadly encounters between police and African-American suspects. High-profile incidents in Ferguson, Mo., Baltimore, Baton Rouge, Chicago and elsewhere have spurred public protest, and cut deep rifts between police and minorities in some communities. The survey suggests that the impact has been just as deep on the morale of rank-and-file police officers.

Suspected Shoplifter Caught Outside Ikea With Frying Pan Stuffed Down Her Leggings: Cops

  Suspected Shoplifter Caught Outside Ikea With Frying Pan Stuffed Down Her Leggings: Cops Instead of admitting to stealing the awkwardly shaped cookware clearly sticking out of her pants, Sierra Coleman, 28, didn't give up without a fight.Sierra Coleman, 28, of Missouri, was arrested after Ikea security said they caught her leaving a St. Louis Ikea store with a frying pan poorly hidden inside her tight leggings.

ATLANTA -- The so-called “ Ferguson effect ” - officers 72 percent said they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem suspicious. In August of 2015, cops stopped and questioned 49,257 people. A year later, those stops dropped to 8,859, down 80 percent.

U . S . Videos. Bail Denied for 4 Suspects in Alleged Facebook Torture Video. Cashier Makes Day of Boy With Cerebral Palsy. 5 Fatalities in Shooting at Fort Lauderdale Airport. U . S . Headlines. US Veteran Arrested in Airport Shooting; 5 Dead, 8 Wounded.

“Within America’s police and sheriff’s departments ... the ramifications of these deadly encounters have been less visible than the public protests, but no less profound,” according to the Pew report.

Three-quarters of officers say the incidents have increased tensions between police and black residents in their communities. More than eight in 10 officers said police work is harder today as a result of the high-profile incidents.

The survey — conducted between May 19 and Aug. 14 with officers at 54 departments — comes on the heels of a year when several big cities — including Chicago, Indianapolis, Memphis, and San Antonio — dealt with surges in murder rates. In the midst of last year’s spike, FBI Director James Comey suggested an increase in violent crime in some cities may be a result of a less-aggressive law enforcement approach in the face of increased public scrutiny.

I don’t think I’ll survive as long as Ferguson and Wenger, admits Conte

  I don’t think I’ll survive as long as Ferguson and Wenger, admits Conte The Blues boss has revealed his admiration for the former Manchester United manager, but doesn’t know if he could go on managing as long as him.Chelsea’s club director, Michael Emenalo, said that he hopes Conte goes on to manage Chelsea “forever”, but Conte is unsure as to whether he could keep going for as long as Ferguson.

High-profile fatal clashes between police and black men in the U . S . have made officers reluctant to use force and stop suspicious people as tensions between cops and African American communities remain on edge, according to a study released Wednesday. The FBI revealed that violent crime had increased over 6 percent in metropolitan counties, with nationwide murder rates up 5.2 percent. The new findings suggest that the so-called Ferguson effect , where officers are backing off their core duties for fear of public scrutiny, has become reality in the U . S .

The so-called " Ferguson effect " - officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be Andrew Cuomo' s assertion that New York will be able to make up for lost electricity generation after - 72 percent said they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem

Former Chicago police superintendent Garry McCarthy recently tied the surge in violence in the nation’s third largest city — which tallied 762 murders and more than 4,300 shooting victims in 2016 — to a decline in street stops by cops. McCarthy was fired from his post in December 2015 after the court-ordered release of a video that showed a white police officer firing 16 shots at 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

That incident, which ignited public backlash, also spurred a Justice Department civil rights investigation of Chicago Police Department’s patterns and practices. The DOJ is expected to issue its findings on its Chicago investigation in the coming days.

In an op-ed in the Chicago Sun-Times published Wednesday, Mayor Rahm Emanuel said it was crucial that the city have an “engaged, proactive police department” as the city tries to stem the violence that has disproportionately impacted a few low-income, predominantly African-American and Latino neighborhoods.

“If the reforms we must, and will, make are seen as demonizing the police, the police will naturally become reactive,” Emanuel wrote in anticipation of the Justice report. “They’re only human. The clarity, certainty and standards they need to do their jobs will be lost, and the result will be more violence. That is not a recipe for success in our communities. The only winners in that case are the gangbangers and drug dealers.”

Congressional Black Caucus Returns 'Pig Cop' Painting To Capitol

  Congressional Black Caucus Returns 'Pig Cop' Painting To Capitol The painting, called "Untitled #1," was the winning submission by high schooler David Pulphus in Democratic Rep. William Lacy Clay's annual art competition in May. Its imagery includes two police officers depicted as anthropomorphic animals, a pig and a horse, pointing guns at what appeared to be a black wolf holding a sign that reads "stop kill." In the background, black human figures can be seen in various positions, including holding megaphones, placed behind bars, seemingly crucified and holding the scales of justice.

Atlanta — The so-called “ Ferguson effect ” — officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be questioned after the fact — has been talked about but never really quantified. A new study suggests the effect is a reality, with three-quarters of officers surveyed saying they are hesitant to use force, even when appropriate, and are less willing to stop and question suspicious people. — 72 percent said they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem suspicious.

ATLANTA (AP) - The so-called " Ferguson effect " - officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be questioned after the fact - has been talked about but never really quantified. A new study suggests the effect is a reality, with three-quarters of officers surveyed saying they are hesitant to use force, even when appropriate, and are less willing to stop and question suspicious people. - 72 percent said they or their colleagues are more reluctant to stop and question people who seem suspicious.

Most participants completed the survey ahead of the fatal shooting of five officers in Dallas in July and the killing of three officers in Baton Rouge less than two weeks later. Both incidents occurred in the aftermath of the fatal police shootings in suburban St. Paul and Baton Rouge that drew nationwide attention. All participants surveyed came from agencies with at least 100 sworn officers.

The survey also showed that black officers' views on high-profile, deadly incidents sharply contrast with their white and Hispanic colleagues.

Twenty-seven percent of white officers and 26% of Hispanic officers say highly publicized deaths of African-Americans during police encounters are indicative of a broader problem between police and African-Americans. Meanwhile, 57% of black officers saying that the incidents are evidence of a broader problem.

The survey also found 67% of officers believe the public has a positive view of police, though rank-and-file officers were less likely than supervisors or administrators to hold that view.

Follow USA TODAY Chicago correspondent Aamer Madhani on Twitter: @AamerISmad

Alleged NYC gold flake thief busted in Ecuador for $1.6M heist .
The lucky leprechaun who cops say stole $1.6 million worth of gold flakes from an armored car in Midtown has been arrested in his native Ecuador, cops said Thursday. Julio Nivelo, 53, who also goes by the name David Vargas, grabbed the 86-pound barrel from the back of a Loomis armored car on 48th St. between Fifth and Sixth Ave. on Sept. 30. cops said. He headed to Florida, then California, before making his way to Ecuador, officials said. Federal Homeland Security Investigations agents helped capture him there Thursday, officials said. Police described Nivelo as a career criminal, and have tentatively linked him to at least seven other similar thefts between May and August, police sources said. His earlier scores weren’t as golden — he grabbed jewelry from a courier truck, camera equipment from a car, clothing and glasses from a Fed Ex truck, and tried but failed to make off with a box of Jimmy Choo designer shoes, sources said. Nivelo has been deported four times to Ecuador, in 1994, 2001, 2005 and 2008, and keeps managing to slip back into the U.S., cops said. Cops released several photos of Nivelo in December, including a whimsical picture of him on Elliott’s flying bicycle from “E.T.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Comments:

comments powered by HyperComments
This is interesting!