US Scientists prepare to march on Trump

13:45  21 april  2017
13:45  21 april  2017 Source:   The Hill

Thousands join March for Science rallies over 'alternative facts'

  Thousands join March for Science rallies over 'alternative facts' Thousands of people rallied in support for science in Europe and Australasia on Saturday ahead of a march in Washington, triggered by rising concern over populism and so-called alternative facts. The March for Science demonstrations have been organised in response to what is seen as mounting political pressure on facts-based evidence.The casualties of this assault, say organisers, include efforts to fight climate change, the teaching of evolution and sexual health and budgets for vital research.

The Women's March on Washington might not be the only big protest against Donald Trump 's policies in the near future. Coordination is underway for a Scientists ' March on Washington that, as the name implies

The Trump -Pence administration's war on facts may have galvanized the next major demonstration in the nation's capital—the Scientists ' March on Washington, which is as yet unscheduled but is garnering significant enthusiasm online.

Scientists prepare to march on Trump © Provided by The Hill Scientists prepare to march on Trump

Scientists and climate activists opposed to the Trump administration are bringing their message to the streets of Washington.

Two marches in D.C. this month will bring out scientists and other protesters who say the Trump administration's policies sideline science's role in public policy, undermining the science on climate change and other issues.

Organizers will host the March for Science on the National Mall on Saturday, followed by the People's Climate March the week after.

Trump is the unifying factor for both marches, both in how they came together and what messages they'll promote.

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The idea to march was spawned on a Reddit forum, according to The Washington Post, and quickly the “ Scientists ’ March on Washington” was born. “Partly, we’re making the case for why they should run — and Donald Trump is really helping us with that,” Naughton tells The Atlantic.

Are Climate Scientists Ready for Trump ? Maybe not. How much should they prepare for his administration? On March 30, 1867, the United States gave the government of Russia a check for .2 million and took possession of a vast new land that became the Alaska Territory.

 "I think it's fair to say that this administration catalyzed the happening of this march, there's no doubt about that," said Lydia Villa-Komaroff, a national co-chairwoman of the March for Science who will speak at the Saturday event.

The March for Science idea grew out of the Women's March, a mass protest that drew millions of demonstrators around the country in January, one day after Trump was sworn in as president.

Science activists saw the event as something they could replicate, and devised similar action  - a large D.C. rally with satellite protests around the country - based on showing general support for science policy.

Speakers in Washington will include television science educator Bill Nye, and other activists, musicians and former administration officials. The event's Twitter account has 350,000 followers and its Facebook page has more than 527,000 "likes" but organizers don't yet have attendance projections.

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Science enthusiasts are preparing to march on Washington, D.C., to lambaste President Donald Trump for The movement describes itself as a collection of “ scientists , science enthusiasts, and concerned citizens.” According to the group, Trump has expressed unacceptable skepticism about

They are so excited by what happened with the great “poo-sai” march that they want to replicate it now, and there’s gonna be a scientists march . “ Science enthusiasts are preparing to march on Washington, D.C., to lambaste President Donald Trump for supposedly embracing the antithesis of

Activists have tried to pitch the March for Science as a non-partisan event, and Saturday's demonstrators won't demand specific policy outcomes beyond supporting science as a guide for public policy.

Next weekend's climate march, on the other hand, will directly pressure policymakers to back away from the Trump administration's energy proposals and work on tackling climate change.

"The March for Science is about recognizing this truth, and the People's Climate March is about acting on it," said Lindsay Meiman, a spokeswoman for 350.org, a climate group that's part of the steering committee of the climate protest.

The idea for the People's Climate March was originally conceived last year, Meiman said, with supporters planning to make their case for a quicker transition from fossil fuels to whoever captured the White House.

It's pitched as the sequel to a 2014 New York climate march that drew 400,000 people and ranks as one of the largest single protests in U.S. history.

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The upcoming March for Science is frequently described as the first time U.S. scientists will take to the streets. Epidemiologist Frank Bove and biochemist Ben Allen know better. Within days of the massive women’s march that followed the inauguration of President Donald Trump on 20 January

“An American government that ignores science to pursue ideological agendas endangers the world.” The Trump -Pence administration’s war on facts may have galvanized the next major demonstration in the nation’s capital—the Scientists ’ March on Washington

Trump's election, followed by his administration's work dismantling much of former President Obama's climate agenda only raised the stakes for this month's event. Organizers expect "tens of thousands" of attendees in Washington and at the 200 other simultaneous events around the country.

"After Donald Trump was elected, we understood it was more important than ever to come together to take action around both pushing back against this administration ... [and] putting forward a vision for transitioning off fossil fuels," Meiman said.

Activists and Democrats have lambasted the Trump administration's approach to science policy, from proposed deep spending cuts at key federal science agencies to its work undoing Obama-era climate change regulations and policies.

Trump's first budget proposed large funding cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Energy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA's Earth science budget.

Along the way, officials have begun the process of stripping away key climate policies from the Obama administration.

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Will the Scientists ’ March on Washington have the same impact the Women’s Marches did? Twitter. Yesterday the Trump administration instituted a media blackout at the Environmental Protection Agency and barred staff from awarding any new contracts or grants.

Will Trump consult with scientists , or go with his gut and advisors? “We have argued that’s the first thing he should do is to bring science into the discussion when he makes decisions,” says Holt.

Those efforts have raised concerns from across the political spectrum, including among some Republicans.

On a call with reporters previewing the science march, Elias Zerhouni, the NIH head under President George W. Bush, said he is concerned about new spending cuts targeting federal scientific research, while Bush's first EPA chief, Christine Whiteman, warned about "politicized" science within the government.

"We do not want to promulgate regulations, rules and laws based on anecdotal evidence," she said. "It's not just NIH, it's EPA, it's NOAA. We're seeing science becoming politicized across the board."

But Trump allies say those criticisms could be lobbed at scientists, as well.

"The problem we face now is that there are very large megaphones at the disposal of people who are promoting their own special interests in the guise of scientific facts," said Myron Ebell, the director of the Center for Energy and Environment at the conservative Competitive Enterprise Institute.

Ebell, who headed Trump's EPA transition team, said scientists have begun using their research to make policy recommendations, something he suggests goes beyond their expertise and should be left to lawmakers.

"Climate policy is not science, and saying, 'I know what we have to have is the cap-and-trade system or the Clean Power Plan' ... I mean, give me a break."

Rush Holt, a former New Jersey congressman who heads the American Association for the Advancement of Science, has sought to cool expectations for the marches, saying activists shouldn't expect to move lawmakers or the administration by protest alone.

"The first thing, before the marchers make demands that Congress do this or the president do that, is there is some remedial work for the public and policymakers to understand the value of science," he said.

"You don't want politicians prescribing what questions can be answered by science. ... Scientists should be saying: here are questions we should answer and here is what we need to answer them."

Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.), a Democrat on the House Science Committee, said he expects the message to be "don't cut" funding for research, a message he hopes resonates with appropriators in Congress.

"For me, it's a matter of remembering the larger picture," he said. "This won't last forever and we need to keep people's spirits up, and keep good research being done."

The March for Science on Earth Day, explained .
The Trump administration is cutting science budgets and denying research. Scientists are pushing back. seems that thousands — maybe even tens of thousands — may show up.

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