US Washington loses fight, might pay up to $2B to save salmon

05:22  20 may  2017
05:22  20 may  2017 Source:   Associated Press

Effort to block Confederate statue's removal goes to court

  Effort to block Confederate statue's removal goes to court A last-ditch effort to block the removal of a monument to a Confederate general in New Orleans has landed in court.At issue before state Judge Kern Reese on Wednesday was whether the city owns the monument honoring Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard. At issue before state Judge Kern Reese on Wednesday was whether the city owns the monument honoring Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard. The statue is located at the entrance to New Orleans City Park. Those who don't want it removed are arguing that it belongs to a park board, and therefore the city has no authority to remove it.

SEATTLE — Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration. A panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last year affirmed a lower court’s 2013 ruling ordering the state to fix

SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing Translator. To read this article in one of Houston's most-spoken languages, click on the button below. US News. Washington loses fight , might pay up

FILE - In this June 22, 2015 photo, Melissa Erkel, a fish passage biologist with the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, looks at a culvert, a large pipe that allows streams to pass beneath roads but block migrating salmon, along the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw, Wash. On Friday, May 19, 2017, a federal appeals court declined to reconsider a ruling that Washington state says will require it to pay nearly $2 billion on salmon habitat. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)© The Associated Press FILE - In this June 22, 2015 photo, Melissa Erkel, a fish passage biologist with the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, looks at a culvert, a large pipe that allows streams to pass beneath roads but block migrating salmon, along the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw, Wash. On Friday, May 19, 2017, a federal appeals court declined to reconsider a ruling that Washington state says will require it to pay nearly $2 billion on salmon habitat. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)

SEATTLE — Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration.

Star-crossed salmon survive spillway's erosion but suffocate

  Star-crossed salmon survive spillway's erosion but suffocate SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A quarter-million hatchery salmon survived the near-collapse of a California dam's spillway this winter, only to suffocate after a pump failed this week, officials said Thursday.They were among about 5 million baby fall-run Chinook salmon that were rescued in February after tons of mud washed down the Feather River, said California Department of Fish and Wildlife spokesman Andrew Hughan. The erosion came from the failing emergency spillway near the Oroville dam that caused the precautionary evacuation of nearly 200,000 residents.The salmon were trucked from the Oroville hatchery to a nearby annex fed by well water.

On Friday, May 19, 2017, a federal appeals court declined to reconsider a ruling that Washington state says will require it to pay nearly $ 2 billion on salmon habitat. The Associated Press — By PHUONG LE - Associated Press. SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which

On Friday, May 19, 2017, a federal appeals court declined to reconsider a ruling that Washington state says will require it to pay nearly $ 2 billion on salmon habitat. Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing

Loading...

Load Error

A panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last year affirmed a lower court's 2013 ruling ordering the state to fix or replace hundreds of culverts — large pipes that allow streams to pass beneath roads but block migrating salmon.

Idaho and Montana joined Washington state in asking the appeals court to reconsider the case. The court declined to do so Friday, but several judges dissented from that decision, saying it should be reconsidered because of its significance.

"This is a win for salmon, treaty rights and everyone who lives here," Lorraine Loomis, chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, said in a statement. The group represents 21 tribes in western Washington that challenged the state over the culverts in 2001, part of decades-long litigation over tribal fishing rights.

Trump Just Revived An Alaskan Gold Mine Project That Obama Blocked Years Ago

  Trump Just Revived An Alaskan Gold Mine Project That Obama Blocked Years Ago WASHINGTON ― The Trump administration announced Friday it had reached a legal settlement with a mining firm to pursue the construction of a proposed gold, copper and molybdenum mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay watershed. President Barack Obama in 2014 blocked construction of the mine, which led to an ongoing legal dispute between the Environmental Protection Agency and developer Pebble Limited Partnership.  The settlement clears the way for the company to apply for a federal permit to build the mine. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt said the agency is withdrawing its rejection in order to let the process move forward.

On Friday, May 19, 2017, a federal appeals court declined to reconsider a ruling that Washington state says will require it to pay nearly $ 2 billion on salmon habitat. Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing

Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration.

"Fixing fish-blocking culverts under state roads will open up hundreds of miles of habitat and result in more salmon," she said.

Messages left with a spokesman for the state Attorney General's Office were not immediately returned Friday.

Washington had sought a rehearing, arguing in part that the court's decision forces the state to spend billions to replace culverts that in some cases wouldn't have an impact on salmon because other there were other barriers upstream or downstream that completely block salmon. It also said the decision would have broad implications for other land and water use management in the Northwest.

"Ordering a State to spend money on something that will make no difference is an abuse of discretion," the state argued in asking for another hearing.

Culverts, or concrete pipes or steel structures, can be a problem for fish in several ways. Among them, the angle of the structure may be too steep for fish to navigate, or stream flows running through a small pipe can be too fast for fish to swim upstream.

Angler reels in Atlantic salmon — on the Detroit River

  Angler reels in Atlantic salmon — on the Detroit River A suburban Detroit fisherman made a rare catch on the Detroit River: an Atlantic salmon weighing 9 pounds, 10 ounces. DETROIT — A suburban Detroit fisherman made a rare catch on the Detroit River: an Atlantic salmon weighing 9 pounds, 10 ounces.

On Friday, May 19, 2017, a federal appeals court declined to reconsider a ruling that Washington state says will require it to pay nearly $ 2 billion on salmon habitat. less. SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon

SEATTLE — Washington state lost a major legal battle Friday, which could force it spend nearly $ 2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration. A panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last year affirmed a lower court's 2013 ruling ordering the state to fix

The U.S. government sued Washington in 2001 on behalf of the 21 tribes to force it to replace the culverts with structures that allow fish to pass through.

Seattle U.S. District Judge Ricardo S. Martinez held that fish-blocking culverts contribute to diminished salmon runs by blocking access to miles of suitable streams. In 2013, he ordered the state to replace hundreds of the highest-priority culverts within 17 years.

The state appealed, arguing that its treaties with the tribes created no obligation to restore salmon habitat.

In declining to reconsider, the panel said Friday that the lower court properly found the state violated the treaty rights of tribes to fish by building and maintaining salmon-blocking pipes under those roads. It said there's ample evidence that fixing the fish-blocking barriers will benefit salmon runs, resulting in more harvestable salmon for the tribes.

But several judges disagreed, said the panel's opinion "sets up precedent that could be used to challenge activities that affect wildlife habitat in other western states." They said the panel's decision upholds an overbroad injunction that requires the state "to spend millions of dollars on repairs that will have no immediate effect on salmon habitat."

'Do what you need to do': Matt Murray ready for Game 7 .
Matt Murray has been through two Game 7s in his NHL career, and the experiences were quite different. For his first, in the Eastern Conference final last season, Murray stopped 16 of 17 shots as the Penguins beat the Lightning, 2-1, to advance to the Stanley Cup final.His second was two weeks ago against Washington. Murray watched from the bench as Marc-Andre Fleury led the Penguins to a 2-0 victory.Murray will be back in the net for his third career Game 7 Thursday night against Ottawa, as he and the Penguins once again face a do-or-die game with a trip to the Stanley Cup final on the line.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
This is interesting!