The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

US Opioid crisis prompts extreme proposals

23:56  17 july  2017
23:56  17 july  2017 Source:   cbsnews.com

Goal of nation's first opioid court: Keep users alive

  Goal of nation's first opioid court: Keep users alive After three defendants fatally overdosed in a single week last year, it became clear that Buffalo's ordinary drug treatment court was no match for the heroin and painkiller crisis. Now the city is experimenting with the nation's first opioid crisis intervention court, which can get users into treatment within hours of their arrest instead of days, requires them to check in with a judge every day for a month instead of once a week, and puts them on strict curfews. Administering justice takes a back seat to the overarching goal of simply keeping defendants alive.

look at the problem overwhelming the city, prompting some to propose extreme solutions. Middletown City Councilman Dan Picard is proposing a "three strikes" plan to end the opioid crisis . At this point, the idea to withhold the response is just that -- an idea, not a formal proposal .

CBS News gets a first-hand look at problem overwhelming Middletown, Ohio, where one councilman warns addicts: "We might not show up to treat you".

  Opioid crisis prompts extreme proposals © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.

The opioid crisis sweeping the country is putting a growing financial and emotional strain on many communities. More than 4,000 people died from unintentional drug overdoses last year in Ohio alone.

Many coroners in the state say the death toll will be higher this year.

CBS News correspondent Tony Dokoupil visited Middletown, Ohio, where the sheriff is refusing to allow deputies to carry the opioid antidote naloxone because of safety concerns.

According to one estimate, opioids could kill nearly half a million people over the next decade. That's like losing the entire population of Atlanta.

GOP Republican: If I have to be that one person to kill healthcare bill, I will

  GOP Republican: If I have to be that one person to kill healthcare bill, I will Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.V.), a fierce opponent of the Senate healthcare bill, reportedly said she will kill the legislation if it comes down to her. The Highest Paying Cash Back Cards Available Today See The Best Cash Back Cards Sponsored by CreditCards.com "I only see it through the lens of a vulnerable population who needs help, who I care about very deeply," she said during an interview with Politico that was published Sunday. "So that gives me strength. If I have to be that one person, I will be it.

Opioid crisis prompts extreme proposals . Cuts in Senate bill could have dire effects on opioid crisis . Proposal in the Senate rolls back Medicaid expansion, and that could potentially cut one treatment center's Medicaid funding by 75 percent.

Trump declares opioid crisis a "national emergency". Estimates say over 59,000 people died from overdose deaths in 2016, and 2 million Americans are addicted to prescription opioids . Opioid crisis prompts extreme proposals .

Middletown has already seen more overdose calls this year than in all of 2016. CBS News got a first-hand look at the problem overwhelming the city, prompting some to propose extreme solutions.

Dokoupil was along for the ride as first responders in Middletown made their way to a fifth overdose call in just over an hour.

"It seems that, you know, the dealer may have made his rounds," EMS Capt. David Von Bargen said. "And various people are startin' to fall out now."

On this call, he saw a woman turning blue on the ground outside her friend's house. Medics worked quickly and were able to save her -- at least for now.

Middletown City Councilman Dan Picard is proposing a "three strikes" plan to end the opioid crisis. Those who overdose once or twice would have to perform community service and pay off the cost of the emergency response. If they don't, there might not be a response the third time.

How Medicaid Cuts Could Exacerbate the Opioid Epidemic

  How Medicaid Cuts Could Exacerbate the Opioid Epidemic <p>As Senate Republicans resume their drive this week to repeal former President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act, one of their principal obstacles is resistance from GOP senators and governors in states that expanded Medicaid under the law. And one of the principal reasons for that opposition is Medicaid’s central role in responding to the opioid challenge.</p>But Green still wasn’t prepared for what she saw when her predecessor took her around this hardscrabble swathe of Appalachia centered on Clay County, which The New York Times once described as the hardest place in the United States to live.

The Opioid Crisis . More than 300,000 Americans have died from overdoses involving opioids since 2000. “I am directing all executive agencies to use every appropriate emergency authority to fight the opioid crisis ,” the President said.

“Similar proposals to Governor Christie’s were floated during the mental health and opioid debates last year and Congress decided on a bipartisan, bicameral basis to go in a different direction,” said Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.).

0717-ctm-opiodcrisis-doukopil2.jpg© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. 0717-ctm-opiodcrisis-doukopil2.jpg

"It's breakin' my hear," said Adonia Martin, a friend of the patient. "She just, they just told me she just overdosed two nights ago. I mean, how many times -- how many more times is she gonna, not gonna make it?"

Calls like this have risen dramatically in recent months. Last year, Middletown EMS made 532 runs for opioid overdoses. This year, they've already had more than 600 runs through June. And they're using more naloxone to counter the effects of stronger synthetic drugs.

City leaders say they've surpassed the $11,000 they spent on the treatment's last year, and are on pace to spend more than $100,000 this year.

"My issue is that we're gonna run out of money," Middletown City Councilman Dan Picard said.

That's why Picard is proposing a "three strikes" plan. Those who overdose once or twice would have to perform community service and pay off the cost of the emergency response. If they don't, there might not be a response the third time.

White House opioid commission misses another deadline

  White House opioid commission misses another deadline President Trump's commission to fight the opioid epidemic will miss a deadline to file an interim report on the crisis for a second time , according to a notice set to be released Friday. The Highest Paying Cash Back Card Is Here See The Top Rated Card Sponsored by CreditCards.com The Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis was created by executive order in March. Mr. Trump tapped New Jersey Gov.

he U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission agreed to allow AmerisourceBergen shareholders to vote on a proposal demanding the wholesaler provide more information on steps taken to manage financial and reputational risks associated with the opioid crisis .

Opioid epidemic prompts extreme proposals From Drudge Report. Monday, July 17, 2017 15:34 PDT.

"My message to addicts is, yeah, stay away from Middletown," Picard said. "'Cause we might not show up to treat you. It's reality."

"Who are we to dictate who's savable and who's not savable," recovering addict Shelly Thompson questioned.

Middletown EMS saved Thompson's life when she overdosed on opioids in 2015.

"Yeah, I was two minutes away from not being able to be here," Thompson said.

She tells CBS News she's been clean for a year and a half, and insists any threat to withhold EMS service won't deter addicts. "The addict is not scared, you know," she said. "They're hopeless. They're hopeless. We need to help these people, not more death."

"We need to be more involved in forcing some type of treatment," added Middletown Police Chief Rodney Muterspaw.

Muterspaw has his own proposal -- he'd like to arrest overdose patients and file criminal charges, which the government would drop if the patient agrees to get help. It's unclear how well this would work. A study last year found "little evidence that compulsory drug treatment is effective."

"You know, I can't tell you it gives me a lot of confidence," Muterspaw said. "But it's better than what we're doing now. Because we're doing nothing now."

Blacked out page of Sessions security clearance form is out

  Blacked out page of Sessions security clearance form is out The Justice Department has released a heavily blacked out page from Attorney General Jeff Sessions' security clearance application. The document has become public in response to a government watchdog group's lawsuit.The application page asks whether Sessions — a senator before joining the Trump administration — or anyone in his immediate family had contact within the past seven years with a foreign government or its representatives.There's a "no" listed, but the rest of the answer is blacked out.

In recognition of the opioid crisis , Canada’s Bill C-37 would lighten requirements so that more sites could open. Instead of having to prove 26 criteria in order to open, those wishing to set up a safe injection site — such as the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre in Ottawa

In a new series for TIME, ‘The Opioid Diaries,’ photographer James Nachtwey documents the worst opioid addiction crisis in U.S. history.

Later that afternoon, Middletown first responders raced to another call. This time, saving a man who overdosed in a store parking lot. They say it goes on like this all day.

"I'm a city counselor," Picard said. "My job, as a city counselor, is to make sure this city can continue to function and provide services to its citizens. And at the rate we're going, we've got to do something."

"Oh, I think the wheels are definitely turning," Muterspaw added. "It's, it's hit a point where it has to change so people are forced to make change."

Middletown EMS reported to a total of eight overdose calls the day we were there. At this point, the idea to withhold the response is just that -- an idea, not a formal proposal. It's unclear whether it would ever withstand a legal challenge.

Since first raising the idea, the city counsilman admits the feedback has been mostly negative. But he points out he's at least sparked a discussion about what to do.

0717-ctm-opiodcrisis-doukopil-1356144-640x360.jpg© Credit: CBSNews 0717-ctm-opiodcrisis-doukopil-1356144-640x360.jpg

Opioid Funding in Limbo as Senate GOP Falters on Health Care Overhaul .
GOP leadership’s decision to scrap the Better Care Reconciliation Act killed a proposal for $45 billion in funding for opioid addiction. Will it return later? No one seems to know.On Monday night, McConnell abandoned that iteration of his party’s plan to repeal and replace Obamacare simultaneously after learning he did not have enough votes to proceed. In doing so, he left behind that proposed funding measure—and in doing so, left the entire provision in limbo.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!