US Trump condemns violence at white nationalist rally

00:01  13 august  2017
00:01  13 august  2017 Source:   CBS News

Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge'

  Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge' House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) denounced white supremacy in the wake of the racially charged clashes in Charlottesville on Saturday. "Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a scourge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a sco urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's vic urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated.

President Trump broke his Twitter silence Saturday after being criticized for his silence as protests turned violent at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Mr. Trump tweeted that all Americans must condemn hate and violence , without mentioning the Charlottesville incident directly.

President Donald Trump tweeted a condemnation of the violence at white - nationalist rallies in Charlottesville over the weekend — without explicitly The president ultimately tweeted, “We ALL must be united and condemn all that hate stands for. There is no place for this kind of violence in America.

Slideshow by photo services

house
Has Your Home's Value Increased?
See It's Current Worth
Sponsored by Trulia

President Trump broke his Twitter silence on Saturday after being criticized for his silence as protests turned violent at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Mr. Trump tweeted that all Americans must condemn hate and violence, without mentioning the Charlottesville incident directly. The "Unite the Right" rally erupted into chaos Saturday morning, resulting in fights, tear gas and injuries and prompting Virginia's governor to declare a state of emergency. Some in the crowds featured Nazi symbols and spewed anti-Semitic rhetoric.

First lady Melania Trump responded to the violence before the president did. Mr. Trump is currently on a 17-day working vacation in Bedminster, New Jersey. The "Unite the Right" rally was originally a reaction to the removal of a statue of confederate general Robert E. Lee from a public park.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan issued a statement condemning the "vile bigotry" just before noon.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-California) called on the country to reject hate.

Trump Complains Media Not 'Satisfied' By Belated Denunciation Of Hate Groups

  Trump Complains Media Not 'Satisfied' By Belated Denunciation Of Hate Groups President Donald Trump on Monday evening complained the “fake news media will never be truly satisfied” by his belated denunciation of white supremacists and other hate groups, two days after violence erupted after a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.“Made additional remarks on Charlottesville and realize once again that the #Fake News Media will never be satisfied,” Trump tweeted. “Truly bad people!”Made additional remarks on Charlottesville and realize once again that the #Fake News Media will never be satisfied…truly bad people!— Donald J.

President Donald Trump is condemning "in the strongest possible terms" what he's calling an "egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides" after clashes at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

President Trump broke his Twitter silence Saturday after being criticized for his silence as protests turned violent at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Mr. Trump tweeted that all Americans must condemn hate and violence , without mentioning the Charlottesville incident directly.

But Mr. Trump's delayed response was quickly noticed by Democrats in Congress.

"Silence speaks loudly," tweeted Rep. Mike Quigley (D-Illinois).

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) called the president's initial silence "defining."

While Democrats were generally quicker to respond to the Charlottesville violence on Twitter, Republicans also condemned the day's events. Rep. Justin Amash (R-Michigan) called for Americans to stand against racism.

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colorado) said the "hate" spewed in Charlottesville is "un-American."

The rally came shortly after a large group of torch-bearing white nationalists marched through the University of Virginia campus Friday night, after a judge issued a ruling allowing Saturday's protest to move forward.

Trump went off-script with 'many sides' remark: report .
President Trump reportedly ad-libbed part of his controversial statement Saturday in response to the violent clashes in Charlottesville, Va. Two White House officials told ABC News the president went off script in his comments, in which he blamed "many sides" for the violence, as opposed to specifically singling out white nationalists and the far right."Those were his own words," one senior White House official said.The official said those words "were not" prepared for the president.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!