US Trump condemns Charlottesville violence but doesn’t single out white nationalists

08:06  13 august  2017
08:06  13 august  2017 Source:   MSN

Republican lawmakers encourage Trump to specifically call out white nationalists

  Republican lawmakers encourage Trump to specifically call out white nationalists Republican lawmakers are encouraging President Trump to specifically call out the white nationalists involved in the violent protests in Charlottesville on Saturday. 6 Cash Back Credit Cards That Payoff Big Are You Eligible? Sponsored by CompareCards “Mr. President - we must call evil by its name,” Colorado Republican Sen. Cory Gardner tweeted. “These were white supremacists and this was domestic terrorism.”Trump didn’t single out the white nationalists when he addressed the unrest on Saturday evening. He blamed “many sides” for the violence.

White nationalist demonstrators clash with counter demonstrators in Charlottesville . Photo: AP. Trump never used the words " white supremacy" or " white nationalism ." World. Trump condemns violence as white nationalists , liberals clash.

Trump tweeted earlier Saturday on the situation in Charlottesville , saying "there is no place for this kind of violence in America." In one tweet, Trump said, "We ALL must be united & condemn all that hate stands for." The tweet, however made no mention of the white nationalists

President Donald Trump speak to members of the media regarding the on going situation in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017 at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminister, N.J.© Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ AP Photo President Donald Trump speak to members of the media regarding the on going situation in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017 at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminister, N.J.

BEDMINSTER, N.J. — President Trump is often quick to respond to terrorizing acts of violence.

As news broke of a terrorist attack in Paris in November 2015, Trump immediately tweeted that he was praying for “the victims and hostages.”  Very soon after a shooting at an Orlando nightclub in June 2016, Trump tweeted that he was “right on radical Islamic terrorism.”

But he kept quiet Saturday morning as a protest led by white nationalists, who arrived with torches and chants in Charlottesville, on Friday night, turned violent. The cable networks that he usually watches showed footage of increasingly violent clashes between the white nationalists, some of whom looked like soldiers because they were so heavily armed, and the counterprotesters who showed up to challenge them.

Trump: 'Alt-left' bears some blame for Charlottesville violence

  Trump: 'Alt-left' bears some blame for Charlottesville violence <p>President Trump says the 'alt-left' bears some responsibility for violence in Charlottesville, 'nobody wants to say that.'</p>President Donald Trump says the groups protesting against white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, were "also very violent.

Populer Post. Trump condemns Charlottesville violence but doesn ’ t single out white nationalists for blame.

Trump ’s candidacy excited many white nationalists , who were thrilled to hear About two hours after the president’s tweet, Trump expanded with four-minute statement that began: “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.”

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He kept quiet as David Duke, the former leader of the Ku Klux Klan, declared that the scene in Charlottesville is a “turning point” for a movement that aims to “fulfill the promises of Donald Trump.”

The president kept quiet as Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) declared a state of emergency — and as Trump’s own wife responded, writing in a tweet that “no good comes from violence.”

Cable news commentary, Twitter and the inboxes of White House spokesmen quickly filled with this question: Where is the president?

Then, at 1:19 p.m. in New Jersey, Trump took a break from his working vacation at his private golf club to tweet: “We ALL must be united & condemn all that hate stands for. There is no place for this kind of violence in America. Lets come together as one!”

Pence defends Trump response to Charlottesville violence

  Pence defends Trump response to Charlottesville violence Vice President Mike Pence on Sunday condemned white supremacists and defended President Trump following criticism that the administration failed to adequately condemn specific groups after Saturday violence in Charlottesville, Virginia."Trump had neglected to name the groups that organized the rally that turned violent in Charlottesville the previous day.

President Trump spoke after hundreds of white nationalists , neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members clashed with counterprotesters in Charlottesville , Va. Login. Register. Log out . My Profile. Subscriber Services.

Zero white nationalists were killed. Trump refuses to condemn white nationalists . Also, he spent more time touting his tired "Stock Market & Unemployment" shtick during speech than he did condemning the violence . Amazing.

Trump has long tiptoed around the issue of white supremacy and has yet to provide a full-throttled rebuke of those who invoke his name. He had to be repeatedly pushed to denounce Duke after the former KKK leader endorsed him and praised him.

Trump’s candidacy excited many white nationalists, who were thrilled to hear Trump mock the Black Lives Matter movement on the campaign trail and declare that “all lives matter.” They rallied behind his promises to build a wall on the southern border, reduce the number of foreigners allowed into the country and pressure everyone in the country to speak English and say “Merry Christmas.” And they celebrated Trump selecting Stephen K. Bannon as his chief strategist, who formerly ran the right-wing Breitbart News and advocated for what he calls the “alt-right” movement.

About two hours after the president’s tweet, Trump expanded with four-minute statement that began: “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.” He then added for emphasis: “On many sides.”

Trump went off-script with 'many sides' remark: report

  Trump went off-script with 'many sides' remark: report President Trump reportedly ad-libbed part of his controversial statement Saturday in response to the violent clashes in Charlottesville, Va. Two White House officials told ABC News the president went off script in his comments, in which he blamed "many sides" for the violence, as opposed to specifically singling out white nationalists and the far right."Those were his own words," one senior White House official said.The official said those words "were not" prepared for the president.

Helicopter crash near Charlottesville white nationalist rally kills two cops. Trump condemns Charlottesville violence , but faces criticism from both sides. Report: Mueller wants to talk to Priebus, other Trump administration officials.

President Donald Trump has condemned the violence taking place in Charlottesville Virginia amid a planned white nationalist rally. The president took to Twitter to denounce the white nationalists who stormed the city with tiki torches for a planned 'Unite the Right' rally.

When asked what the president meant by “on many sides,” a White House spokesperson responded: “The President was condemning hatred, bigotry and violence from all sources and all sides. There was violence between protesters and counterprotesters today.” When pressed on what exactly the president saw or heard from the counterprotesters that was bigoted or hateful, the spokesman did not respond.

Later in the evening, Trump offered his condolences to a victim and "best regards to all of those injured."

Trump never used the words “white supremacy” or “white nationalism.” He didn’t detail what acts or words he considers to be hateful or bigoted. He didn’t mention the vehicle that had driven into a crowd of counterprotesters in Charlottesville — a tactic that has been repeatedly used by Islamic State terrorists. He scolded both sides and treated their offenses as being equal. He was vague enough that his statement could be interpreted in a number of different ways.

“Did Trump just denounce antifa?” tweeted Richard Spencer, who helped organize the protest in Charlottesville, using a term short for “anti-fascist” to describe violent liberal protesters.

In letter to staff, DeVos condemns Charlottesville violence

  In letter to staff, DeVos condemns Charlottesville violence After criticism over her muted response to the violence in Charlottesville, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has written a letter to her staff condemning the "tragic and unthinkable" events and blasting "neo-Nazis and other racist bigots."DeVos' email to Education Department employees came after she was criticized publicly for insufficiently condemning the violence. DeVos had published two posts on Twitter and retweeted another post by Melania Trump.

President Trump has condemned the violent clashes and a car ramming incident in Charlottesville , Virginia, saying that “the division must stop.” The statement has, however, angered his critics who insist he should have singled out white nationalists .

President Donald Trump condemned hate "on many sides" in response to violent white nationalist protests in Charlottesville , Virginia, that have played out on national television Saturday. "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on

But many other Americans wanted their president to be crystal-clear when it comes to white supremacy and what they were witnessing in Charlottesville. The president’s tweet and statement were quickly questioned and protested.

“There is only one side,” tweeted former vice president Joe Biden.

Many Democrats were more critical of Trump.

“The President’s talk of violence ‘on many sides’ ignores the shameful reality of white supremacism in our country today, and continues a disturbing pattern of complacency around such acts of hate,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said in a statement.

During last year’s campaign, former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton sought to make white nationalists’ support for Trump a liability.

One a single day last August, her campaign released a video that featured Ku Klux Klan members and other white supremacists touting Trump’s candidacy — then gave a speech condemning past racially inflammatory remarks by Trump and his support among the “alt-right,” which she described as an “emerging racist ideology.”

In a series of tweets Saturday, Clinton said her “heart is in Charlottesville today” and added that “the incitement of hatred that got us here is as real and condemnable as the white supremacists in our streets.”

Many Republicans took a similar approach.

Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee (R), whose daughter, Sarah Huckabee Sanders is Trump’s press secretary, tweeted: “ ‘White supremacy’ c*** is worst kind of racism-it’s EVIL and perversion of God’s truth to ever think our Creator values some above others.”

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) both urged the president to use the words “white supremacists” and to label this as a terrorist attack.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) released a strongly worded statement that said, in part: “White supremacists and neo-Nazis are, by definition, opposed to American patriotism and the ideals that define us as a people and make our nation special.”

And Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) tweeted: “We should call evil by its name. My brother didn’t give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas to go unchallenged here at home.”

Wagner reported from Washington.

LeBron James Speaks Out on Charlottesville, President Trump .
LeBron James took to Twitter Saturday to voice his displeasure with the violence and white nationalist rallying taking place in Charlottesville, Va. this weekend, and appeared to take a pointed swipe at President Donald Trump as well.&nbsp;James, who has been famously outspoken on social issues in the past, expressed his sadness at the weekend’s events and made a reference to Trump’s ‘Make America Great Again’ slogan, appearing to punctuate it with a sense of frustration. The white nationalists openly and verbally aligned themselves with Trump’s campaign rhetoric, with some Charlottesville marchers yelling “Heil Trump” while also parroting antiquated, racist sentiment.

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