US Charlottesville Begins to Face its Own Past After Rally Turns Deadly

19:06  13 august  2017
19:06  13 august  2017 Source:   NBC News

Red Wings denounce use of logo at white nationalist rally

  Red Wings denounce use of logo at white nationalist rally The Detroit Red Wings said Saturday they are considering legal action to stop white nationalists from using their logo as part of a "disturbing" rally in Charlottesville,

CHARLOTTESVILLE , Virginia — Residents of Charlottesville reeling after a white nationalist allegedly plowed into a crowd of anti-fascist protesters turned their attention to the deep-seated divisions that may have attracted hate Charlottesville Rally Violence: At Least One Killed, Several Injured 3:07.

Former KKK leader David Duke also says Saturday's rally is in a ' turning point' in the effort to help people like him 'fulfill the promises of Donald Trump'. Charlottesville Begins to Face its Own Past After Rally Turns Deadly .

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CHARLOTTESVILLE, Virginia — Residents of Charlottesville reeling after a white nationalist allegedly plowed into a crowd of anti-fascist protesters turned their attention to the deep-seated divisions that may have attracted hate groups to the town in the first place.

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  Obama shares Mandela quote after deadly white supremacist rally Former President Obama tweeted a Nelson Mandela quote condemning racism hours after a white supremacist rally in Virginia turned deadly. "No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion" Obama tweeted, featuring a photo of him talking to small children of different ethnicities through a window. "No o"No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion..." Obama tweeted, featuring a photo of him talking to small children of different ethnicities through a window.

Charlottesville Begins to Face its Own Past After Rally Turns Deadly . Feds Launch Probe Into Rally Violence as Sessions Pledges 'Justice Will Prevail'.

Protests and counter-protests in Charlottesville , Virginia turned deadly when a car plowed into a crowd Saturday. Charlottesville Begins to Face its Own Past After Rally Turns Deadly .

"I think in a Southern city, Southern town, white supremacy is woven into the American DNA," said Rev. Seth Wispelwey of the local United Church of Christ. "There's a lot of unreconciled history that has gone unchallenged."

Saturday's gathering marked the fourth time since May that white nationalists have gathered to protest Charlottesville's decision to remove the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and rename parks dedicated to Confederate leaders.

The statue's location in Emancipation Park — formerly known as Lee Park — has become a meeting place for the conservative movement mixing racism, white nationalism and populism known as "alt-right." This right-wing activism comes amid a renewed push across the South to remove Civil War-era symbols and names from public places.

2 Virginia Officers Killed in Helicopter Crash Are Mourned

  2 Virginia Officers Killed in Helicopter Crash Are Mourned State police Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates died in the crash of a helicopter that had been monitoring an "alt-right" rally in. The Virginia state police on Saturday were mourning the loss of a pilot and a trooper-pilot killed in the crash of a helicopter that had been monitoring a white nationalist and "alt right" rally in Charlottesville.

Mayor Michael Signer joins Meet the Press to talk about the aftermath of violent protests in Charlottesville , saying "the healing has just begun ." Charlottesville Begins to Face its Own Past After Rally Turns Deadly .

Charlottesville Begins to Face its Own Past After Rally Turns Deadly . Feds Launch Probe Into Rally Violence as Sessions Pledges 'Justice Will Prevail'.

Warning: This slideshow may contain graphic images.

Photo slideshow by MSN News

Professor wrongly identified as Charlottesville marcher

  Professor wrongly identified as Charlottesville marcher A professor at the University of Arkansas was incorrectly identified as one of the marchers at the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va., The New York Times reported on Monday. The mistake was detailed in a report by The Times about social media users seeking to identify those who were photographed attending the rally. Kyle Quinn runs a lab at the university and was misidentified as a bearded man at the rally wearing a shirt that said "Arkansas Engineering."The mistake brought him an onslaught of vulgar messages on social media, including posts revealing his family's home address and calls for him to lose his job.

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Wispelwey, who has lived most in Charlottesville most of his life, and other locals were still processing the shock that washed over so many after white protesters and counter-protesters clashed in the heart of the city.

Most upsetting was when a silver Dodge Challenger drove into a crowd of counter-demonstrators, killing a 32-year-old woman and injuring 19 people. Soon after, police arrested 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr. of Ohio, and charged him with one count of second-degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding and one count of "hit and run attended failure to stop with injury."

Fifteen others were injured at the rally, while a pilot and a trooper-pilot also died when helicopter that they were in nearby crashed.

"We have to talk to each other, but we also have to work to address the real problems that exist in the foundations of our community."

Wispelwey said he began his Saturday by leading a group of clergy and faith-based leaders on a march. He, along with Jill Williams, a local teacher who marched with another clergy group, said they avoided areas where white nationalists were congregating and instead gathered with locals to counter hate groups.

Sean Clinchy, who lives in downtown Charlotte, said he felt it was important for residents to stand up and be counted.

"A lot of us felt that you had to show up and show there were more of us than them," he said.

A number of locals who spoke with NBC News felt a need to participate in peaceful counter-rallies, but did not expect the violence even though they have witnessed months of building tensions.

Image: A young woman sits near a makeshift candlelight vigil© A young woman sits near a makeshift candlelight vigil for those who died and were injured when a car... Image: A young woman sits near a makeshift candlelight vigil

Brian Calhoun was one of those who began handing out water and offering bathroom breaks to those walking on the street in front of his house. Living just a block away from Emancipation Park still does not make Calhoun nervous, but he admitted to feeling afraid for the first time after seeing the Dodge Challenger ram the crowd.

Virginia rally organizers, driver hit with $3 mln lawsuit -court papers

  Virginia rally organizers, driver hit with $3 mln lawsuit -court papers <p>Two people who say they were injured in Saturday's far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Tuesday sued the driver charged with killing a woman by driving his car through the crowd as well as the event's organizers for $3 million.</p>Tadrint Washington and his sister Micah Washington said in papers filed in Charlottesville circuit court that they had been among the people hurt when James Alex Fields drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one.

The car ploughed into the crowd two hours after police shut down a white nationalist rally before it could even begin in a Charlottesville park. “We are future oriented.” The group has erected billboards that said “SECEDE” in several states, and it even has its own banner -- a black and white

"We're going to get through this," he said about his community. "But it seems like most of the violent protesters are coming to Charlottesville."

He added: "Why is this happening here?"

Residents seemed eager to answer that question by forcing blunt conversations and acknowledging the social and economic divisions that slice through what Calhoun described as a "tiny, artsy, peaceful town."

Two residents pointed to decades of gentrification as a reason why many low-income African Americans have felt shunned by their own city.

Soon after white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine African Americans in a Charleston, South Carolina, church in 2015, many in Charlottesville started highlighting the towns' deepening economic divide. Some also agree with African Americans activists have called for Confederate leaders' statues to be removed and to rename parks the monuments stand in.

Image: People gather during a vigil in Charlottesville© People gather during a vigil in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday night. Image: People gather during a vigil in Charlottesville

Charlottesville's city council voted to remove two statues, but there has since been a delay due to a pending legal case, which has allowed white nationalist to use the issue as a focus of protests.

Though many white nationalists, neo-Nazis and radical counter-protesters came from outside Charlottesville, residents admitted white nationalism was embedded in the community.

Blogger Jason Kessler, who organized Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally, is a Charlottesville local. Richard Spencer, the man who is considered to have coined the term "alt-right," went to school in Charlottesville's University of Virginia.

Now that the beginning of the school year is approaching, Williams, the teacher, said she was hoping other local educators would help students have open and frank discussions about what happened.

"The guy who drove the car reportedly was 20 years old," she said. "You know I teach high school and we need to talk about this with the kids — all of it."

Still, Williams said she was afraid that some teachers would feel it was best to pretend the whole thing hadn't happened.

Though a somber feeling lingers over Charlottesville, all those interviewed said they were not fearful about living in their town.

"'No hate, no fear,' that's what we've been chanting," said Williams, adding that wasn't the whole answer.

"We have to talk to each other, but we also have to work to address the real problems that exist in the foundations of our community," she said. "If all we do is say 'let's love,' there's more work to be done than that."

Image: Passerby comforts a man at late night vigil for victims of the car attack on counter protesters at the © A man stops to comfort Joseph Culver (L) of Charlottesville as he kneels at a late night vigil to pa... Image: Passerby comforts a man at late night vigil for victims of the car attack on counter protesters at the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville

Virginia rally organizers, driver hit with $3 mln lawsuit -court papers .
<p>Two people who say they were injured in Saturday's far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Tuesday sued the driver charged with killing a woman by driving his car through the crowd as well as the event's organizers for $3 million.</p>Tadrint Washington and his sister Micah Washington said in papers filed in Charlottesville circuit court that they had been among the people hurt when James Alex Fields drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one.

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