US Texas university removes 'white supremacy' statues overnight

14:21  21 august  2017
14:21  21 august  2017 Source:   Reuters

Kentucky mayor announces removal of Confederate statues in wake of Charlottesville

  Kentucky mayor announces removal of Confederate statues in wake of Charlottesville The mayor of Lexington, Kentucky is accelerating his plans to remove Confederate statues from key locations in the city due to violence spurred by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Va. on Saturday. "I am taking action to relocate the Confederate statues. We have thoroughly examined this issue, and heard from many of our citizens," Mayor Jim Gray (D) said on Twitter."The tragic events in Charlottesville tod ay have accelerated the announcement I intended to make next week," he continued.Gray said he is looking to remove Confederate statues at the city's Historic Courthouse, which will be the city's new visitors center.

Texas university removes ' white supremacy ' statues overnight - Violence broke out in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Aug. 12 when white nationalists protesting against the planned removal of a statue of Confederate military leader Robert E. Lee clashed with anti-racism demonstrators.

The University of Texas at Austin removed the statues of three Confederate-era figures from a main area on campus on Monday, saying they had become symbols of white supremacy and that they were taken down overnight to avoid confrontations.

FILE PHOTO: People walk at the University of Texas campus in Austin© REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz FILE PHOTO: People walk at the University of Texas campus in Austin The University of Texas at Austin removed the statues of three Confederate-era figures from a main area on campus on Monday, saying they had become symbols of white supremacy and that they were taken down overnight to avoid confrontations.

Violence broke out in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Aug. 12 when white nationalists protesting against the planned removal of a statue of Confederate military leader Robert E. Lee clashed with anti-racism demonstrators. One woman was killed when a suspected white nationalist drove his car into a crowd.

Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge'

  Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge' House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) denounced white supremacy in the wake of the racially charged clashes in Charlottesville on Saturday. "Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a scourge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's victims. White supremacy is a sco urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated," Ryan said on Twitter. Our hearts are with today's vic urge. This hate and its terrorism must be confronted and defeated.

These monuments represent white supremacy , and black lives haven’t mattered in this county the same as a white man’s matters.” Some questioned why the school would choose to remove the statues overnight , but UT spokesman Gary Susswein cleared it up

University of Texas President Greg Fenves said such monuments have become "symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism." Asked why the school decided to remove the statues during the overnight hours, UT spokesman Gary Susswein said recent events played a factor.

President Donald Trump's reaction to the events has drawn widespread anger from across the political spectrum. Trump did not immediately condemn white nationalists and said there were "very fine people" on both sides, prompting several chief executives to quit his business councils in protest.

"Last week, the horrific displays of hatred at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville shocked and saddened the nation," University of Texas at Austin President Greg Fenves said in a statement.

"These events make it clear, now more than ever, that Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism."

Fenves announced the removal of the statues shortly before midnight on Sunday. By about 3 a.m. local time on Monday, they had all been taken down, said Cindy Posey, director of campus safety communications. It was done at night as a safety measure to avoid confrontations, she said.

Ryan Says 'There Can Be No Moral Ambiguity' In Tweet That Spares Trump

  Ryan Says 'There Can Be No Moral Ambiguity' In Tweet That Spares Trump House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) on Tuesday said “there can be no moral ambiguity” about the repugnance of white supremacy in what appeared to be an ambiguous response to President Donald Trump’s off-the-rails press conference.“We must be clear. White supremacy is repulsive. This bigotry is counter to all this country stands for,” Ryan tweeted. “There can be no moral ambiguity.”We must be clear. White supremacy is repulsive. This bigotry is counter to all this country stands for. There can be no moral ambiguity.

The University of Texas at Austin is removing four Confederate monuments that it says have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism, the school The statues of Hogg, governor of Texas from 1891 to 1895, will be considered for re-installation at another campus site, he added.

University of Texas President Greg Fenves ordered the immediate removal of statues of Robert E. Lee Their reasoning is flawed. These monuments represent white supremacy , and black Asked why the school decided to remove the statues during the overnight hours, UT spokesman Gary

A growing number of U.S. political leaders are calling for the removal of statues honoring the Confederacy, saying they promote racism. Supporters of keeping the statues in place contend they are a reminder of Southern heritage and the country's history.

The statues of three Confederate figures and a former governor removed from the university's main mall were "erected during the period of Jim Crow laws and segregation" and "represent the subjugation of African Americans," the university president said.

The statues include depictions of Lee, who led the pro-slavery Confederacy's army, of Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston and of Confederate Postmaster General John Reagan.

Those three will be moved to the school's Briscoe Center for American History, where they will be accessible for scholarly study, Fenves said.

Workers also removed a statue of former Governor James Stephen Hogg, who led Texas from 1891 to 1895, years after the Civil War ended in 1865. It will be considered for re-installation at another university site, Fenves said.

Several cities have targeted Confederate symbols in response to the violence in Charlottesville. They include Baltimore, Maryland, which removed four monuments to the Confederacy in a pre-dawn operation last week, and Birmingham, Alabama, where the mayor vowed to seek the removal of a Confederate monument in his city.

On Saturday, Duke University removed a statue of Lee from the entrance of a chapel on the Durham, North Carolina, campus.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

GOP lawmaker breaks with Trump, says Confederate statues should come down .
Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Wis.) broke with many members of his party, including President Trump, by expressing support for removing Confederate statues in the wake of violence stemming from a white supremacist march in Virginia this month. Duffy, who typically defends Trump's policy positions, said at a roundtable in Wisconsin that he doesn't think Confederate leaders should be glorified."I look at those Southern leaders - that rebellion cost hundreds of thousands of American lives in the Civil War," Duffy said during a discussion on drug abuse on Thursday, according to the Wausau Daily Herald. "They were fighting to keep people enslaved.

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