US Black Lives Matter activist Deray Mckesson was only surprised by one thing when he was sued by police officers—their anonymity

19:00  08 october  2017
19:00  08 october  2017 Source:   Quartz

Separate marches on racial justice set to unify

  Separate marches on racial justice set to unify Two marches will take place in the nation's capital Saturday in the name of racial and gender inequality. The March for Racial Justice and the March for Black Women will start out separately in the morning before joining to converge on the National Mall.

The Baton Rouge, La., police officer who anonymously sued both Black Lives Matter and activist DeRay Mckesson will have to seek his legal revenge elsewhere.

Campaign Zero co-founder and prominent activist in the Movement for Black Lives DeRay Mckesson is being sued by an unnamed Baton Rouge, La., police officer who claims he was injured during a protest in the city four days after a police officer killed Alton Sterling

  Black Lives Matter activist Deray Mckesson was only surprised by one thing when he was sued by police officers—their anonymity © Provided by Quartz Deray Mckesson has had not one, but two police officers sue him and Black Lives Matter in the last couple of months. He doesn’t seem fazed, however. “It is not a new tactic for people to use any avenue they can to silence black activists,” he says.

The Black Lives Matter movement was born five years ago after unarmed 17-year-old African American Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, who was later acquitted of his crime of murdering the teenager. The incident took place in America but it grew global prominence after Black Lives Matter used the event to campaign against the negative experiences that black people face in the US and to assemble protests as “a call to action and a response to the virulent anti-Black racism that permeates our society.”

Facebook Giving Congress Russia-linked Ads

  Facebook Giving Congress Russia-linked Ads The ads are linked to 470 fake accounts that were set up by the Kremlin-linked Internet Research Agency. The ads are being given to the House and Senate intelligence committees and the Senate Judiciary Committee. In a blog post early last month Facebook revealed its investigation tracked at least $100,000 spent on ads from the accounts that spread divisive messages about LGBT rights, race, immigration and gun control targeted at American voters.Facebook hasn’t released the names of the accounts, but some contained the words “refugee” and “patriot.

A police officer anonymously sued Black Lives Matter and DeRay Mckesson , a prominent activist in the movement, after being injured by a rock thrown during a protest over a deadly police shooting in Baton Rouge last year.

When Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson isn’t leading protest marches, he lives comfortably in a home provided by wealthy donors. McKesson was arrested last weekend during a protest in Louisiana.

Speaking to Quartz at the One Young World Summit in Bogotá, Colombia, Mckesson says he wasn’t worried: “I know I didn’t do anything wrong.” What did surprise Mckesson was that the two officers were suing him anonymously.

“I was most surprised that the officers feared for their safety so they wouldn’t put their names on the lawsuit,” he says. “That was sort of wild to me. We’re the people afraid of you guys. I don’t know why you’re acting [like] you’re afraid of us.”

Mckesson spoke to Quartz in Colombia.

At the heart of both lawsuits is the Baton Rouge protest in 2016, where police officers clashed with Black Lives Matter protesters. The protestors were demonstrating against the shooting and subsequent death of Alton Sterling by hands of two white police officers. US prosecutors did not file charges against the officers, citing insufficient evidence. At the protest, dozens of protestors were arrested, including McKesson.

Protesters in St. Louis arrested after blocking traffic - police

  Protesters in St. Louis arrested after blocking traffic - police Police in St. Louis arrested several demonstrators on Tuesday after they blocked downtown and interstate traffic as they protested against the acquittal of a white former police officer who was accused of murdering a black man, authorities said. Police in riot gear took demonstrators into custody as they gathered on Interstate 64, a highway that runs through the city, and then at a busy downtown intersection, snarling evening traffic, city media reported."We don’t see a riot here. Why are you in riot gear?," the protesters chanted as they carried "Black Lives Matter" signs, according to the St. Louis Post Dispatch.

The judge was ruling in the suit filed by a Baton Rouge, Louisiana police officer who anonymously sued both Black Lives Matter and activist DeRay Mckesson . The police officer filed his lawsuit against BLM and Mckesson last year

One police officer then sued Black Lives Matter and McKesson , after he lost several teeth when a projectile thrown by a protestor struck him in the face — but a federal judge dismissed the suit on Thursday, ruling that Black Lives Matter , like the Tea Party

“We’re the people afraid of you guys. I don’t know why you’re acting [like] you’re afraid of us.” In the first case, a police officer who was hit with a rock during the protest (injuring the officer’s jaw and teeth), claimed Mckesson “incited the violence… was in charge of the protest” and also claimed that he saw and heard Mckesson give orders that led to incidences like this. The officer, who had also sued Black lives Matter, had his case dismissed.

“Although many entities have utilized the phrase ‘Black Lives Matter’ in their titles or business designations, Black Lives Matter itself is not an entity of any sort,” Brian Jackson, a US district judge, wrote in his ruling. The judge also noted that Mckesson “solely engaged in protected speech.”

The second lawsuit against Mckesson and Black Lives Matter was filed on behalf of the sheriff’s deputy, who was wounded by a gunman a week after the protests (the gunman went on to shoot and kill three other law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge in 2016). The suit accused Black Lives Matter and five of its leaders of inciting the violence that led to the killings. The judge intends to dismiss the second suit too.

Judge intends to dismiss 2nd suit against Black Lives Matter

  Judge intends to dismiss 2nd suit against Black Lives Matter BATON ROUGE, La. — A federal judge says he intends to dismiss a lawsuit that accuses Black Lives Matter and several movement leaders of inciting violence that led to a gunman's deadly ambush of law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge last year.U.S. District Judge Brian Jackson issued that warning in an order Wednesday, less than a week after ruling Black Lives Matter is a social movement and therefore can't be sued.Last Thursday, Jackson threw out a police officer's lawsuit blaming Black Lives Matter and movement leader DeRay Mckesson for injuries he sustained during a protest over a deadly police shooting in Baton Rouge last year. (AP Photo/Max Becherer, File) BATON ROUGE, La.

In a related story, a Baton Rouge police officer who claimed he was injured during a Black Lives Matter protest after a deadly police shooting also filed a lawsuit on Monday against the organization and DeRay Mckesson , who was arrested at the demonstration.

Among the four named in the suit - [which was filed by a 42-year-old unnamed officer who was injured in the attack] - is activist and former Baltimore Mayoral candidate DeRay McKesson . McKesson had actually been down in Baton Rouge the week prior to the shooting, when he was arrested while

Mckesson won’t be silenced

When asked if he’s thinking about running for office again (Mckesson finished sixth in the Democratic primary to be Baltimore mayor in 2016), he says “maybe.” He’s keen to point that young, black activists have been entering government. Last March, Randall Woodfin, aged 36, became the youngest mayor in Birmingham, Alabama in US modern history.

“I think we will continue to see laws and structures change.” “We’ll see a lot more young people run, which I’m excited about,” Mckesson says, who insists it’s vital for activists to be as “organized on the inside as we are on the outside.” And with the 2018 midterm election just a year away, “more people than ever understand what’s at stake,” he adds.

It took decades for the civil rights movement to make concrete gains, Mckesson says, and Black Lives Matter has only been operating for a few years. That said, “the conversation about race and justice is completely different then it was three years ago,” Mckesson says. “And I think we will continue to see laws and structures change.”

The One Young World, which gathers 1,300 young leaders from all 196 countries to tackle the globe’s most pressing issues, contributed to accommodation of the writer’s trip to Colombia.

  Black Lives Matter activist Deray Mckesson was only surprised by one thing when he was sued by police officers—their anonymity © Provided by Quartz

118 police officers killed in line of duty in 2016, FBI says .
Of 66 officers who were killed in incidents the FBI described as criminal, 62 were killed by firearmsA total of 118 law enforcement officers died in the line of duty in the U.S. last year, according to an FBI report released Monday. It said 52 of the deaths were accidental and 66 were felonious.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!