World Canada bars diplomats from bringing family to Cuba

05:55  17 april  2018
05:55  17 april  2018 Source:   NBC News

Scientists can’t explain why diplomats in Cuba are suffering from ‘traumatic brain injury’

  Scientists can’t explain why diplomats in Cuba are suffering from ‘traumatic brain injury’ But Canada is now pulling all families of diplomats from the country.They say they have heard painful, high-pitched noises and lost their hearing. “Some were asleep and awakened by the sound, even as others sleeping in the same bed or room heard nothing,” the Associated Press reported. Scores have reported headaches, dizziness, nausea and difficulty concentrating.

Canadian diplomats and their families were targeted in their homes by apparent 'sonic attacks' in the Cuban capital. (Franklin Reyes/Associated Press). At least five Canadian diplomatic families were affected by mysterious "sonic attacks" in Cuba that left them with symptoms including hearing loss

Mystery behind U.S. decision to yank diplomats from Cuba ? While doctors and scientists search for clues as to what caused it, on Friday the State Department warned against travel to the island dictatorship and said it is bringing home families and much of the embassy staff.

Image: People pass by the Canada's Embassy in HavanaCanada's Embassy in Havana. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Image: People pass by the Canada's Embassy in HavanaCanada's Embassy in Havana.

Canadian diplomats stationed in Cuba will no longer be accompanied by their families amid a rash of persistent, unusual and unexplained health problems, the country's foreign affairs department said Monday.

Canada's embassy will now be designated an "unaccompanied post," according to a statement from Canadian officials.

The symptoms, which include dizziness, headaches and an inability to concentrate, also struck 24 Americans affiliated with the embassy in Havana, prompting the State Department to recall all non-emergency personnel in September.

Cuba, once bustling with heavy-spending Americans, sees steep decline in U.S. travelers

  Cuba, once bustling with heavy-spending Americans, sees steep decline in U.S. travelers Despite modest tweaking of U.S.-Cuba policy, U.S. travel to Cuba has dropped off significantlyBut Cuba – not long ago bustling with good-tipping, heavy-spending Americans – is experiencing a steep decline in U.S. travelers.

Three diplomatic families left Cuba as a result, the official said. Francisco Palmieri of the State Department told a Senate subcommittee it's "incomprehensible" that Cuba doesn't know who is behind alleged attacks that harmed U.S. and Canadian diplomats .

Whatever caused the mysterious noises heard by American diplomats in Cuba also apparently caused brain damage. Global Affairs Canada spokeswoman Brianne Maxwell said Canadian officials "are aware of unusual symptoms affecting Canadian and US diplomatic personnel and their families in

Eight Canadians received medical treatment after reporting symptoms last year. Three families returned home.

In the statement, Canadian officials said that while there had been no new cases, health problems have continued among families who left Cuba.

"In some cases the symptoms have appeared to lessen in intensity, before reasserting themselves," the statement said.

Medical researchers at the University of Pennsylvania found that the problems could add up to a new kind of "acquired" brain injury, the officials said, adding that more research was needed.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said last month that it was still unclear who or what was behind the ailments.

"The investigation continues," she said. "It's not something that we're giving up on."

Miguel Díaz-Canel becomes Cuba's president, Raúl Castro steps down

  Miguel Díaz-Canel becomes Cuba's president, Raúl Castro steps down Cuba has a new president, and for the first time in over 40 years, his last name is not Castro. Miguel Díaz-Canel officially became president on Thursday morning after Raúl Castro, 86, officially stepped down and Díaz-Canel was confirmed by the National Assembly. The 86-year-old Castro will remain head of the Communist Party, the most powerful governing body on the island. But his departure from the presidency represents a symbolic shift in a leadership of octogenarians. Díaz-Canel, who has served as Cuba's first vice president since 2013, turns 58 on Friday.

Newly released memos show the federal government sent a Health Canada doctor to Cuba to examine diplomats who suffered everything from nosebleeds to short-term memory loss amid concern about mysterious acoustic attacks.

The federal government sent a Health Canada doctor to Cuba to examine diplomats who suffered everything from dizziness and nosebleeds to hearing problems and short-term memory loss amid However, she declined to say how many diplomats and family members have been affected.

Canadian officials said Monday that an environmental assessment of diplomatic quarters revealed no clues. U.S. officials have theorized that a sonic weapon is to blame, and Rex Tillerson, then the secretary of state, attributed the symptoms to "health attacks" by the Cuban government. Cuban officials, meanwhile, have welcomed FBI investigators and called such theories "completely false."

In a technical report published last month, computer scientists at the University of Michigan found that the problems may have been caused by two eavesdropping devices — and the potentially harmful ultrasonic distortion they produce.

"While our experiments do not eliminate the possibility of malicious intent to harm diplomats, our experiments do show that whoever caused the sensations may have had no intent for harm," they wrote.

Diaz-Canel formally proposed to replace Castro as Cuban president .
<p>Miguel Diaz-Canel would become the island's first non-Castro leader since the 1959 revolution.</p>Castro, 86, is stepping down after 10 years in office. The National Assembly was due to vote later in the day on the proposal to replace him with Diaz-Canel, a 57-year-old engineer who is currently first vice president.

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