World Japan flood toll nears 200, sun scorches thousands battling thirst

08:00  12 july  2018
08:00  12 july  2018 Source:   reuters.com

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More than 200 ,000 households had no water a week after torrential rains caused floods and set off landslides across western Japan .

Rescuers in flood -hit Japan search for the missing as death toll tops 150. Thousands of homes were still without clean water and electricity in Hiroshima and other hard-hit areas. Residents lined up for water under the scorching sun as temperatures rose to 35 Celsius -- 95 Fahrenheit, raising risks

(Slideshow by Photo Services)

Rescuers comb through mud for Japan flood victims; 134 dead

  Rescuers comb through mud for Japan flood victims; 134 dead Rescuers are combing through mud-covered hillsides and near riverbanks searching for dozens of people missing after heavy rains unleashed flooding and mudslides in southwestern Japan, where the death toll has exceeded 130. More than 50 people were unaccounted for as of Tuesday morning, many in the hardest-hit Hiroshima area.Work under the scorching sun was hampered by mud and heat, and shipments of relief goods were delayed by damaged roads and transportation systems, especially in areas isolated by the disaster."No water, food, nothing gets here," Ichiro Tanabe, a 73-year-old Kure resident, told the Mainichi newspaper.

Rain tapered off across the western region battered by last week’s downpour, revealing blue skies and scorching sun . Tens of thousands had no water, Japanese media said. The death toll from the rains reached at least 94 after floodwaters forced several million people from their homes, NHK

Japan flood toll nears 200 , sun scorches thousands battling thirst . July 12, 2018. Panchkula: Police yet to arrest man who attacked retired Air Force officer.

Intense heat and water shortages raised fears of disease outbreaks in flood-hit western Japan on Thursday as the death toll from the worst weather disaster in 36 years neared 200.

More than 200,000 households had no water a week after torrential rains caused floods and set off landslides across western Japan, bringing death and destruction to decades-old communities built on mountain slopes and flood plains.

The death toll rose to 195, with several dozen people still missing, the government said on Thursday.

With daily temperatures above 30 Celsius (86 Fahrenheit) and high humidity, life in school gymnasiums and other evacuation centers, where families spread out on mats on the floors, began to take a toll.

Television footage showed one elderly woman trying to sleep by kneeling with her upper body on the seat of a folding chair, arms over her eyes to keep out the light.

With few portable fans in the evacuation centers, many survivors tried to cool themselves with paper fans.

The limited water supply meant that people are not getting enough fluids and in danger of suffering from heatstroke, authorities said. People are also reluctant to use what water they do have to wash their hands, raising fears of epidemics.

Destroyed Mazda is seen at a landslide site caused by heavy rain in Kumano Town© REUTERS/Issei Kato Destroyed Mazda is seen at a landslide site caused by heavy rain in Kumano Town

"Without water, we can't really clean anything up. We can't wash anything," one man told NHK television.

Toll in Japan rains rise to 122, as hope for survivors fades

  Toll in Japan rains rise to 122, as hope for survivors fades The toll in deadly rainfall that has devastated parts of Japan with flooding and landslides rose Tuesday to 122, as hopes faded that further survivors could be found.Dozens of people are still missing, and with the rains finally letting up on Monday, rescue workers were able to reach previously cut-off places where authorities fear more bodies may be trapped beneath debris.With the toll mounting, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe cancelled a four-country foreign trip, and he was expected to visit the disaster-hit region later this week.Over 70,000 emergency workers have been deployed to dig through flood waters and the aftermath of landslides that have transformed the landscape in parts of central and western Japan.But four days after the worst of the rains began, hope was starting to fade that the search would find new survivors."I have asked my family to prepare for the worst," said Kosuke Kiyohara, 38, as he waited for word of his sister and her two young sons in the town of Kumano."I can't reach her phone," he told AFP on Monday, sitting across from a house that had been ripped apart and tossed on its side by a huge landslide.Rescue workers acknowledged the odds of finding people alive were getting longer."It's possible that survivors will be found, but as the days pass the likelihood becomes slimmer," a soldier nearby told AFP.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe canceled an overseas trip to deal with Japan 's worst flood disaster since Rain tapered off across the western region on Monday to reveal blue skies and a scorching sun According to NHK public television, the death toll stood at 126 by Tuesday morning, with another six

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe canceled an overseas trip to deal with Japan ’s worst flood disaster since Rain tapered off across the western region on Monday to reveal blue skies and a scorching sun According to NHK public television, the death toll stood at 126 by Tuesday morning, with another six

The government has sent water trucks to the disaster area, but supplies remain limited.

More than 70,000 military, police and firefighters toiled through the debris in a grim search for the missing.

Some teams shoveled dirt into sacks and piled the bags into trucks. Others used diggers and chainsaws to work through landslides and splintered buildings.

Many areas were buried deep in mud that smelled like sewage and had hardened in the heat, making the search more difficult.

Disasters set off by torrential rains have become more frequent in Japan, perhaps due to global warming, experts say. Dozens of people died after similar rains caused flooding around the same time last year.

"It's an undeniable fact that this sort of disaster due to torrential, unprecedented rain is becoming more frequent in recent years," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said at a news conference in Tokyo.

"Preserving the lives and peaceful existence of our citizens is the government's biggest duty. We recognize that there's a need to look into steps we can take to reduce the damage from disasters like this even a little bit," he added.

(Additional reporting by Kaori Kaneko; Writing by Elaine Lies; Editing by Darren Schuettler)

Forced from home by floods, Japanese go back to school .
Kaon Omori peeked into her classroom in the Japanese town of Kurashiki, gawping at evacuees forced from their homes by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed 179 people. "In the classroom, all the desks and chairs have been moved to the sides, and people I've never seen before are staying inside," she mumbled."It's really weird," the 12-year-old said, touching her bobbed hair.Authorities ordered as many as five million people to evacuate their homes during the record rains that have cut a swath through parts of central and western Japan.

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