World Afghan Taliban releases video of U.S., Australian hostages

21:50  11 january  2017
21:50  11 january  2017 Source:   Reuters

300 Marines to Aid Fight Against Taliban in Spring

  300 Marines to Aid Fight Against Taliban in Spring The Marines will train and advise the Afghan military and the national police in Helmand Province, replacing an Army unit stationed there. KABUL, Afghanistan — Approximately 300 United States Marines will return this spring to help fight a resurgent Taliban in the southern Afghan province of Helmand, the site of a yearslong bloody campaign, American officials in Afghanistan said on Saturday.An American military spokesman in Kabul said the Marines would replace an Army unit stationed in Helmand, and would offer training and advice to members of the Afghan military and the national police.

^ Hostage North American pair appear in Taliban video , urge end to Kabul executions. " Taliban Releases 3 Afghan Aid Workers". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2012-03-08. "Japanese tourists' bodies identified in Afghanistan - ABC News ( Australian Broadcasting Corporation)" (in Chinese).

▶ A Canadian held hostage in Afghanistan since 2012 and his family are living a "Kafkaesque nightmare," according to a video released today by the Haqqani Network, a Taliban -linked group. In past videos , the couple have appealed to the Afghan , American and Canadian governments, since Boyle is a Canadian citizen. But this time they address only the U . S . and Afghanistan , begging the two to “reach an agreement.”

This image made from video released by the Taliban on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017 shows an Australian identified as Timothy Weekes making a statement on camera while in captivity. The video shows Weekes and an American who were kidnapped in August, the first time they’ve been seen since their abduction. The two men, an American identified as Kevin King and an Australian identified as Timothy Weekes, were abducted outside the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul, where they worked as teachers. (militant video via AP) © The Associated Press This image made from video released by the Taliban on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017 shows an Australian identified as Timothy Weekes making a statement on camera while in captivity. The video shows Weekes and an American who were kidnapped in August, the first time they’ve been seen since their abduction. The two men, an American identified as Kevin King and an Australian identified as Timothy Weekes, were abducted outside the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul, where they worked as teachers. (militant video via AP) The Afghan Taliban released a video on Wednesday showing an Australian and an American hostage pleading with the U.S. government to negotiate with their captors and saying that unless a prisoner exchange was agreed they would be killed.

Dozens killed or wounded in Kabul attack - Afghan officials

  Dozens killed or wounded in Kabul attack - Afghan officials The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for twin blasts near parliament offices in Kabul on Tuesday which they said had killed or wounded scores of people. The attack targeted a minibus carrying staff from the NDS, Afghanistan's main intelligence agency, and as many as 70 people were killed or wounded, the insurgents said.There was no immediate confirmation of casualty numbers from the police.The attack, which ended a period of relative calm in the Afghan capital, occurred in a crowded area during the afternoon rush hour as workers were returning home.

Kidnapped couple and young children plead for their freedom in Taliban video Reuters. A Canadian man and his American wife have appeared in a new video pleading with their respective governments to secure their release from the captivity of the Afghan Taliban . The footage showed the children of Joshua Boyle and Caitlan Coleman for the first time since they were captured in 2012. The earlier recordings warned that the hostages would be killed if the Afghan government continued executing Taliban prisoners.

An American woman being held hostage with her Canadian husband and two children — both born in captivity — pleaded with the American and Canadian governments for help in a newly released Taliban propaganda video . The video appeared to show Caitlan Coleman and her husband Joshua Boyle, who were kidnapped while hiking in Afghanistan in late 2012.

Timothy Weeks, an Australian teacher at the American University in Kabul and his American colleague Kevin King were seized near the campus in August.

The video, which Weeks said was made on Jan. 1, showed the two men, both bearded, asking their families to put pressure on the U.S. government to help secure their release.

Addressing President-elect Donald Trump, who is due to take office on Jan. 20, Weeks said the Taliban had asked for prisoners held at Bagram air field and at Pul-e-Charkhi prison on the outskirts of Kabul to be exchanged for them.

"They are being held there illegally and the Taliban has asked for them to be released in our exchange. If they are not exchanged for us then we will be killed," he said.

"Donald Trump sir, please, I ask you, please, this is in your hands, I ask you please to negotiate with the Taliban. If you do not negotiate with them, we will be killed."

In September, the Pentagon said U.S. forces mounted a raid to try to rescue two civilian hostages but the men were not at the location targeted.

Kidnapping has been a major problem in Afghanistan for many years. Most victims are Afghans and many kidnappers are criminal gangs seeking ransom money but a number of foreigners have also been abducted for political ends.

Last year, the Taliban released a video showing a U.S. hostage and her Canadian husband abducted in 2012 asking their governments to pressure the Kabul government not to execute Taliban prisoners.

(Reporting by James Mackenzie; Editing by Louise Ireland)

Did Trump forget Afghans? .
<p>Donald Trump has minced few words about his plans to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and end the threat from Islamic State extremists.</p>But the president-elect has been virtually silent on his plans when it comes to Afghanistan, home to America's longest war.

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