World UK court rehears Charlie Gard case in light of new evidence

04:10  11 july  2017
04:10  11 july  2017 Source:   Associated Press

Pope reverses Vatican stand on British sick baby case

  Pope reverses Vatican stand on British sick baby case Pope Francis called Sunday for the parents of a terminally ill British baby to be allowed to do everything possible to treat their 10-month-old son, amending the Vatican's previous position after conservatives complained. In a statement, the Vatican press office said Francis "is following with affection and sadness the case of little Charlie Gard and expresses his closeness to his parents. For this he prays that their wish to accompany and treat their child until the end is not neglected.

London - A British court assessed new evidence on Monday in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard after his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented.

LONDON (AP) - A British court on Monday gave the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard a chance to present fresh evidence that their terminally ill son should receive "If there is new evidence I will hear it." But he rejected an attempt by the child's parents to have another judge hear the case .

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Despite big offers, little has changed for baby Charlie Gard

  Despite big offers, little has changed for baby Charlie Gard <p>The terminally ill baby is at the center of a global crusade to have him treated in the United States.</p>LONDON — The president of the United States has offered to help. The pope is willing to have the Vatican hospital take him in. Some 1.3 million pounds ($1.68 million) have been raised to help him leave Britain for treatment.

LONDON — A British court assessed new evidence Monday in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard after his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented.

LONDON (AP) — A British court on Monday gave the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard a chance to present fresh evidence that their terminally ill son should receive experimental treatment. Judge Nicholas Francis gave the couple until Wednesday afternoon to present the evidence and set a new

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LONDON — A British court on Monday gave the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard a chance to present fresh evidence that their terminally ill son should receive experimental treatment.

Judge Nicholas Francis gave the couple until Wednesday afternoon to present the evidence and set a new hearing for Thursday.

The decision came after an emotionally charged hearing in which Gard's mother wept in frustration and his father yelled at a lawyer.

The re-opening of the case at London's High Court may allow Charlie to receive the therapy treatment at his current hospital or abroad.

Great Ormond Street Hospital, which had intended to turn off the baby's life support systems, applied for the court hearing because of "new evidence relating to potential treatment for his condition."

New hearing Monday for terminally ill British baby

  New hearing Monday for terminally ill British baby Connie Yates and Chris Gard rallied support for their son on Sunday, extending a campaign to move the 11-month-old to America -- after doctors and judges in England determined that Charlie should be taken off life support."Unfortunately, they are not specialists in Charlie's condition, the specialists are in America -- where we want to go," Chris Gard says.Charlie was born healthy but a severe genetic condition soon left him blind, deaf and unable to breathe. His doctors saw no hope of recovery.

LONDON (AP) — A British court assessed new evidence Monday in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard after his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented.

LONDON – A British court assessed new evidence Monday in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard after his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented.

The evidence came from researchers at the Vatican's children's hospital and another facility outside of Britain.

The application came after both Pope Francis and President Donald Trump fueled international attention to the case, with hospitals in Rome and the U.S. offering to provide Charlie the experimental therapy.

Previous court rulings have said that Charlie couldn't receive the treatment for his mitochondrial depletion syndrome, a rare genetic disease that left him with brain damage and unable to breathe unaided, and that he should be taken off of life support.

British and European courts sided with the hospital's original stance that the experimental treatment was "unjustified" and might cause Charlie more suffering with no cure.

Francis, the judge, insisted there had to be "new and powerful" evidence to reverse earlier rulings barring Charlie from traveling abroad for treatment.

Parents of sick British baby return to court

  Parents of sick British baby return to court The parents of Charlie Gard, the terminally ill baby at the center of a trans-Atlantic appeal, is still fighting to keep their son alive.&nbsp;LONDON — The parents of Charlie Gard, the terminally ill British baby at the center of a trans-Atlantic appeal, returned to a court here Thursday in a renewed effort to keep their son alive.

London - A British court assessed new evidence on Monday in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard after his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented.

LONDON – A British court assessed new evidence Monday in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard after his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented.

"There is not a person alive who would not want to save Charlie," Francis said. "If there is new evidence I will hear it."

But he rejected an attempt by the child's parents to have another judge hear the case.

"I did my job," he said. "I will continue to do my job."

Charlie's parents were overcome with emotion during the hearing. At one point, the baby's father, Chris Gard ,yelled at a barrister representing the hospital: "When are you going to start telling the truth?"

The baby's mother, Connie Yates, added: "It's really difficult."

A petition supporting Charlie's right to treatment has garnered around 350,000 signatures and more than 1.3 million pounds ($1.7 million) have been raised online for his case.

Connie Yates told Sky News that she wanted judges to listen to experts on his condition who say the treatment might help.

She said that seven specialists from around the world have voiced their support and told her that the treatment has an "up to 10 percent chance of working."

"I hope they can see there is more of a chance than previously thought and hope they trust us as parents and trust the other doctors," she said.

U.S. expert flies to Britain to examine baby Charlie Gard .
<p>A U.S doctor offering experimental treatment to a critically ill British baby is due in London this week to help persuade a judge to keep the boy's life support switched on, in a case that has prompted a fierce debate around the world about medical ethics.</p>The parents of Charlie Gard, who has a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage, have been fighting a legal battle to send him to the United States for the neurologist's experimental therapy. But Britain's courts have refused permission on the grounds it would prolong his suffering without a realistic prospect of it helping.

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