World UAE denies hacking Qatar news agency

14:20  17 july  2017
14:20  17 july  2017 Source:   BBC News

Qatar rejects latest threat of 'siege countries'

  Qatar rejects latest threat of 'siege countries' Qatar hit back Friday at a threat by four "siege countries" to impose further sanctions on the emirate over its refusal to bow to their ultimatum for ending the Gulf crisis. 2 Credit Cards Charging 0% Interest Until 2019 See The Best 0% APR Cards Sponsored by NextAdvisor In a statement attributed to a senior foreign ministry source, a defiant Qatar said the demands of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain were defamatory.

Tensions between Qatar and Saudi Arabia — a Middle East heavyweight — bubbled to the surface two weeks ago when Qatar said its state-run news agency and its Twitter account were hacked to Qatari Riyal Under Pressure as Saudi, UAE Banks Delay Qatar Deals. More Middle East News .

The United Arab Emirates has denied it was behind the alleged hacking of Qatar 's state news agency in May. The Washington Post cited US intelligence officials as saying the UAE had orchestrated the posting of incendiary quotes attributed to Qatar 's emir that he insisted were fabricated.

Qatari man takes a photo during the inaugural signing of a wall bearing a portrait of Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani in Doha on 13 July 2017: Sheikh Tamim Al Thani said the incendiary quotes attributed to him were fabricated© AFP Sheikh Tamim Al Thani said the incendiary quotes attributed to him were fabricated

The United Arab Emirates has denied it was behind the alleged hacking of Qatar's state news agency in May.

man handing card
Trending Now: The 10 Best Balance Transfer Cards
See The Cards
Sponsored by NextAdvisor

The Washington Post cited US intelligence officials as saying the UAE had orchestrated the posting of incendiary quotes attributed to Qatar's emir that he insisted were fabricated.

The incident helped spark a diplomatic rift between Qatar and its neighbours.

UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said on Monday that the Post's report was "not true".

Arab states seek to step up pressure on Qatar over 2013 accord

  Arab states seek to step up pressure on Qatar over 2013 accord Four Arab states sought on Monday to pile pressure on Qatar over charges it backs terrorism, saying the publication of a previously secret accord between Riyadh and Doha showed Qatar broke a promise not to meddle in the affairs of Gulf countries. The text of the 2013 agreement, whose existence was known but whose contents have never before been made public, was first published by CNN on Monday and later released on social media by Saudi officials.

While Qatar quickly denied the comments attributed to ruling emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, Saudi-owned satellite channels repeatedly aired them The alleged hack happened early on Wednesday morning and hours later, the website of the Qatar News Agency still was not accessible.

Russian officials on Wednesday angrily rejected allegations that Russian hackers breached Qatar 's state news agency and planted a fake news story that led to a split between Qatar and the other Arab nations.

He also reiterated that the UAE and five other Arab nations had not written to Fifa to demand that Qatar be stripped of the right to host the 2022 World Cup.

Swiss news network The Local said a fake news story quoting Fifa president Gianni Infantino had been posted on a copycat website on Saturday.

Map© BBC Map
  • Qatar World Cup boycott is 'fake news'
  • Qatar crisis: What you need to know

The Washington Post's story cited unnamed US intelligence officials as saying newly analysed information confirmed that on 23 May senior members of the UAE government had discussed a plan to hack Qatari state media sites.

Later that day, the official Qatar News Agency quoted Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani as criticising US "hostility" towards Iran, describing it as an "Islamic power that cannot be ignored", and calling Hamas the "legitimate representative of the Palestinian people".

Arab states say Qatar-US terror accord 'insufficient'

  Arab states say Qatar-US terror accord 'insufficient' An agreement between Qatar and the United States on combating terror funding is "insufficient", the four Arab states that imposed sanctions on the emirate said in a joint statement Tuesday. The memorandum of understanding announced in Doha during a visit by US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is "the result of pressure and repeated calls over the past years by the four states and their partners upon Qatar to stop supporting terrorism," said Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates.

UAE . Kuwait. Tensions between Qatar and Saudi Arabia - a Middle East heavyweight - bubbled to the surface two weeks ago when Qatar said its state-run news agency and its Twitter account were hacked to publish a fake story claiming the emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, had called Iran

The United Arab Emirates has denied it was behind the alleged hacking of Qatar 's state news agency in May. The Washington Post cited US intelligence officials as saying the UAE had orchestrated the posting of incendiary quotes attributed to Qatar 's emir that he insisted were fabricated.

Qatari officials said the agency had been hacked by an "unknown entity" and that the story had "no basis whatsoever". However, the remarks were reported across the region and caused a stir.

The UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt responded by blocking Qatari media.

Two weeks later, the four countries cut all links with Qatar over its alleged support for terrorism and relations with Iran. The boycott has caused turmoil in the oil- and gas-rich emirate, which is dependent on imports by land and sea for the basic needs of its population of 2.7 million.

  • Why Qatar is the focus of terrorism claims
  • Why the West should be worried

The US intelligence officials told the Post it was unclear whether the UAE authorities had hacked the Qatar News Agency itself or paid a third party to do it.

The Guardian reported last month that an investigation by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation had concluded that freelance Russian hackers were responsible.

US intelligence agencies declined to comment on the Post's article, but the UAE's ambassador in Washington insisted that it "had no role whatsoever in the alleged hacking".

"What is true is Qatar's behaviour. Funding, supporting, and enabling extremists from the Taliban to Hamas and Gaddafi. Inciting violence, encouraging radicalization, and undermining the stability of its neighbours," Yousef al-Otaiba wrote in statement posted on Twitter.

Who Planted the Fake News at Center of Qatar Crisis? .
Two fake stories planted in local and international media have made the tiny nation look soft on terror and seem intended to harm its relationship with the U.S."Fake news" designed to harm Qatar's relations with the U.S. played a major role in the diplomatic split between the tiny Gulf nation and its neighbors, say both U.S. officials and the Qatari government.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!