World Latin America to slam Trump's 'military option' threat

20:35  12 august  2017
20:35  12 august  2017 Source:   Reuters

Pence to begin Latin America tour as global crises grow

  Pence to begin Latin America tour as global crises grow Vice President Mike Pence will visit Colombia amid escalating tensions with neighboring Venezuela and North Korea. PencePence is set to meet with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos on Sunday at the start of a weeklong trip to Latin America that is likely to be dominated by conversations about the deepening crisis in Venezuela, where the U.S. accuses President Nicolas Maduro of a power grab that has sparked deadly protests and condemnation across the region.

CARACAS/LIMA: Latin American nations led by Peru are negotiating a written rebuke of U. S . President Donald Trump after he said the United States was considering a " military option " involving Venezuela, as the crisis-stricken country prepares its own response.

WRAPUP 2- Latin America to slam Trump ' s ' military option ' threat - Trump on Friday threatened military intervention in Venezuela, a surprise escalation of Washington's response to the nation's crisis.

Police guard as press stand outside the Venezuela's embassy in Lima© REUTERS/Mariana Bazo Police guard as press stand outside the Venezuela's embassy in Lima

Latin American nations led by Peru are negotiating a written rebuke of U.S. President Donald Trump after he said the United States was considering a "military option" involving Venezuela, as the crisis-stricken country prepares its own response.

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Trump on Friday threatened military intervention in Venezuela, a surprise escalation of Washington's response to the nation's crisis.

Caracas disparaged the threat as "craziness" and its foreign minister was due to make a statement at 11 a.m. EST (1500 GMT).

Venezuela's Maduro seeks to capitalize on Trump's military threat

  Venezuela's Maduro seeks to capitalize on Trump's military threat <p>While U.S. Vice President Mike Pence travels to Latin America tamping down concern over his boss's threat of possible military action in Venezuela, the country's leader Nicolas Maduro sought to capitalize on local outrage by holding an "anti-imperialist" protest on Monday.</p>The march started with a late morning rally and was expected to end at the presidential palace where Maduro will address the crowd, while a conciliatory Pence continued a tour of the region that began in Colombia on Sunday.

Venezuela slams Trump ’ s military threat as ‘act of craziness’. Trump won’t rule out ‘ military option ’ in Venezuela. Meanwhile, Venezuela’s Communications Minister Ernesto Villegas described Trump ’ s threat as “an unprecedented threat to national sovereignty.”

Venezuela slams Trump ’ s military threat as ‘act of craziness’. Trump won’t rule out ‘ military option ’ in Venezuela. Meanwhile, Venezuela’s Communications Minister Ernesto Villegas described Trump ’ s threat as “an unprecedented threat to national sovereignty.”

Peru was the first to condemn Trump's threatened use of force and is negotiating a written response with other nations in the region, Foreign Minister Ricardo Luna said in a statement sent exclusively to Reuters on Saturday. The statement came the day after Peru expelled Venezuela's ambassador in Lima.

“All foreign or domestic threats to resort to force undermine the goal of reinstating democratic governance in Venezuela, as well as the principles enshrined in the UN charter,” said Luna.

Peru under President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski has taken the toughest stance yet toward Venezuela's socialist government.

Venezuela is undergoing a major economic and social crisis, with millions suffering from food and medicine shortages, soaring inflation and months-long anti-government unrest that has killed more than 120 people.

Venezuela's Maduro seeks to capitalize on Trump's military threat

  Venezuela's Maduro seeks to capitalize on Trump's military threat <p>While U.S. Vice President Mike Pence travels to Latin America tamping down concern over his boss's threat of possible military action in Venezuela, the country's leader Nicolas Maduro sought to capitalize on local outrage by holding an "anti-imperialist" protest on Monday.</p>The march started with a late morning rally and was expected to end at the presidential palace where Maduro will address the crowd, while a conciliatory Pence continued a tour of the region that began in Colombia on Sunday.

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A Cuban professor on international relations, Luis Suarez has said that the treats made by U. S . President Donald Trump about a “possible military option ” in Venezuela, constitutes a “serious aggression” to Latin America and the Caribbean.

President Nicolas Maduro has faced withering criticism from around the world for leading the formation of an all-powerful legislature that critics call the creation of a dictatorship. He says it will bring peace to the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries member.

The ruling Socialist Party has for years accused the United States of plotting an invasion as a way of controlling its oil reserves, the world's largest, through a military intervention similar to the Iraq war.

Previous U.S. administrations had brushed this off as politicized bravado meant to distract from Venezuela's domestic problems.

Under former President Barack Obama, the State Department in 2015 made quiet diplomatic overtures that led to several high-level meetings. The effort ultimately foundered as Maduro hardened his stance against opposition critics.

Venezuela's opposition has remained quiet on the subject, stuck between backing the idea of a foreign invasion or supporting a president they call a dictator.

Venezuela's Information Minister Vladimir Villegas on Saturday tweeted a picture of the Statue of Liberty holding a machine gun instead of a torch, and a link to an article describing, "A Chronology of U.S. 'Military Options' in Latam and the Caribbean."

(Writing by Girish Gupta and Caroline Stauffer; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn)

Trump's threat of Venezuela military action could bolster Maduro .
Trump's threat of Venezuela military action could bolster MaduroPresident Nicolas Maduro has continued the free-spending socialist "revolution" started by his predecessor, the late Hugo Chavez, almost 20 years ago. Key to the populist rhetoric used by both is a constant drumbeat of warnings that the U.S. "empire" is planning an invasion to steal Venezuela's oil.

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