World Rohingya insurgents open to peace but Myanmar ceasefire ending

08:20  07 october  2017
08:20  07 october  2017 Source:   Reuters

U.N. agency: More reports of sexual violence against Rohingya

  U.N. agency: More reports of sexual violence against Rohingya The head of the U.N.'s migration agency warned Wednesday about increasing reports of sexual violence directed at Rohingya Muslims.Director-General William Lacy Swing, of the International Organization for Migration, said he was "shocked and concerned" about the reports of sexual and gender-based violence among Rohingya newly arrived in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) insurgent group declared a month-long unilateral ceasefire , starting Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the de facto leader of Myanmar and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate for her long struggle Among its recommendations was an end to the state-sanctioned

After more than two weeks of violence in Myanmar 's Rakhine state, the insurgent group Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, or ARSA, declared It also calls on the government of Myanmar to cease all military offensive operations and participate in assisting the victims. The ceasefire will be in place

A Myanmar soldier stands near Maungdaw, north of Rakhine state© REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun A Myanmar soldier stands near Maungdaw, north of Rakhine state

Muslim Rohingya insurgents said on Saturday they are ready to respond to any peace move by the Myanmar government but a one-month ceasefire they declared to enable the delivery of aid in violence-racked Rakhine State is about to end.

The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) did not say what action it would take after the ceasefire ends at midnight on Monday but it was "determined to stop the tyranny and oppression" waged against the Rohingya people.

"If at any stage, the Burmese government is inclined to peace, then ARSA will welcome that inclination and reciprocate," the group said in a statement.

Oxford college removes Suu Kyi portrait

  Oxford college removes Suu Kyi portrait The Oxford University college where Aung San Suu Kyi studied has taken down a portrait of the Myanmar leader who has been criticized over the Rohingya crisis.The portrait, which was on display in the main entrance of St Hugh's College, has been placed in storage and was replaced on Thursday with a new painting gifted by Japanese artist Yoshihiro Takada.

Myanmar Rohingya insurgent group ARSA declares ceasefire in state of Rakhine. In a DW interview, Iranian rights activist Shirin Ebadi has criticized fellow Nobel peace laureate and Myanmar 's leader Aung San Suu Kyi for ignoring the Rohingya plight.

Rohingya rebels in Myanmar declare truce1:56. Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar have declared a one-month unilateral ceasefire to ease the humanitarian FORMER Nobel Peace laureate Desmond Tutu has penned a powerful open letter to one of the most well-known winners of the prize.

Government spokesmen were not immediately available for comment.

When the ARSA announced its one-month ceasefire from Sept. 10, a government spokesman said: "We have no policy to negotiate with terrorists."

The rebels launched coordinated attacks on about 30 security posts and an army camp on Aug. 25 with the help of hundreds of disaffected Rohingya villagers, many wielding sticks or machetes, killing about a dozen people.

In response, the military unleashed a sweeping offensive across the north of Rakhine State, driving more than half a million Rohingya villagers into Bangladesh in what the United Nations branded a textbook example of "ethnic cleansing".

Myanmar rejects that. It says more than 500 people have been killed in the fighting, most of them "terrorists" who have been attacking civilians and torching villages.

Myanmar ready to take back Rohingya refugees: minister

  Myanmar ready to take back Rohingya refugees: minister A Myanmar minister on Monday proposed taking back hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims who fled to Bangladesh after a military crackdown, according to Dhaka's top diplomat.But no details of the planned repatriation were given by Bangladesh Foreign Minister A.H Mahmood Ali, and there was widespread scepticism over whether any of the more than 800,000 Muslim Rohingya now in Bangladesh would return.

Share this with. These are external links and will open in a new window. Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar have declared a one-month unilateral ceasefire to ease the humanitarian crisis in northern Rakhine state.

Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army declared a one-month unilateral ceasefire from this Sunday to enable humanitarian aid groups to provide assistance in northwest Myanmar . Tags: Dukascopy, Dukascopy News, Dukascopy Analytics.

The ability of the ARSA, which only surfaced in October last year, to mount any sort of challenge to the Myanmar army is not known but it does not appear to have been able to put up resistance to the military offensive unleashed in August.

Inevitably, there are doubts about how the insurgents can operate in areas where the military has driven out the civilian population, cutting the insurgents off from recruits, food, funds and information.

The ARSA accused the government of using murder, arson and rape as "tools of depopulation".

'NATIVE'

The ARSA denies links to foreign Islamists.

In an interview with Reuters in March, ARSA leader Ata Ullah linked the creation of the group to communal violence between Buddhists and Muslims in Rakhine in 2012, when nearly 200 people were killed and 140,000, mostly Rohingya, displaced.

The group says it is fighting for the rights of the Rohingya, who have never been regarded as an indigenous minority in Myanmar and so have been denied citizenship under a law that links nationality to ethnicity.

Aid groups seek $434 million for Rohingya crisis for next six months

  Aid groups seek $434 million for Rohingya crisis for next six months Humanitarian organizations helping Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh said on Wednesday they need $434 million over the next six months to help up to 1.2 million people, many of them children, who need life-saving help. There are an estimated 809,000 Rohingya sheltering in Bangladesh after fleeing violence and persecution in Myanmar, more than half a million of whom have arrived since Aug. 25 to join 300,000 Rohingya who were already in Bangladesh.

Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar have declared a one-month unilateral ceasefire to ease the humanitarian crisis in northern Rakhine state. Various world leaders have urged Ms Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace laureate who spent years under house arrest for her pro-democracy activism, to speak out on

blog 'brittanyjenkins.blogdetik.com' is not exists. The God Metaphor: Faith, Fear and Opening to Extraterrestrial Contact epub

The group repeated their demand that Rohingya be recognized as a "native indigenous" ethnic group, adding that all Rohingya people should be allowed "to return home safely with dignity ... to freely determine their political status and pursue their economic, social and cultural development".

The Rohingya have long faced discrimination and repression in Rakhine State where bad blood between them and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists, stemming from violence by both sides, goes back generations.

The ARSA condemned the government for blocking humanitarian assistance in Rakhine and said it was willing to discuss ceasefires with international organizations so aid could be delivered.

Some 515,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh but thousands remain in Rakhine.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi has faced scathing criticism for not doing more to stop the violence, although a military-drafted constitution gives her no power over the security forces.

Suu Kyi has condemned rights abuses and said Myanmar was ready to start a process agreed with Bangladesh in 1993 by which anyone verified as a refugee would be accepted back.

Many refugees fear they will not have the paperwork they believe Myanmar will demand to allow them back.

(Writing by Robert Birsel; Editing by Stephen Coates)

Pope will enter Rohingya minefield with Myanmar-Bangladesh trip .
Pope Francis will wade into the religious and political minefield of Myanmar's crackdown on Rohingya Muslims and the effects of their exodus to Bangladesh.The Vatican on Tuesday released the itinerary for the Nov. 26-Dec. 2 trip, which has taken on greater visibility since Myanmar security forces responded to Rohingya militant attacks with a broad crackdown in August. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh in what the United Nations has called "textbook ethnic cleansing.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!