World Small quake rattles North Korea nuclear testing grounds, not manmade: South Korea

02:35  13 october  2017
02:35  13 october  2017 Source:   Reuters

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BEIJING/SEOUL--A small earthquake near North Korea 's nuclear test site on Saturday was probably not manmade , the nuclear proliferation watchdog and a South Korean official said, easing fears Pyongyang had exploded another nuclear bomb just weeks after its last one.

South Korea 's Yonhap news agency quoted the Korea Meteorological Agency (KMA) as saying "there is no possibility that this could be an artificial quake ." "This event occurred in the area of the previous North Korean Nuclear tests . We cannot conclusively confirm at this time the nature (natural or

FILE: SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 03: Lee Mi-Seon, a Monotoring director of the National Earthquake and Volcano Center, shows seismic waves taking place in North Korea on a screen at the Korea Meteorological Administration center on September 3, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea. © Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images FILE: SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 03: Lee Mi-Seon, a Monotoring director of the National Earthquake and Volcano Center, shows seismic waves taking place in North Korea on a screen at the Korea Meteorological Administration center on September 3, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea. A small earthquake rattled the area near North Korea's nuclear testing field but it did not appear to be manmade, South Korea's weather agency said on Friday, the latest to be observed after the North conducted its sixth and biggest nuclear test in early September.

Friday's quake was a magnitude 2.7 with a depth of 3 km in North Hamgyong Province in North Korea, the Korea Meteorological Administration said, near the Punggye-ri nuclear testing site.

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A small earthquake near North Korea ’s nuclear test site on Saturday was probably not manmade , the nuclear proliferation watchdog and a South Korean official said, easing fears Pyongyang had exploded another nuclear bomb just weeks after its last one.

A small quake near North Korea 's nuclear test site on Saturday was probably not manmade , the nuclear proliferation watchdog and a South Korean official said, easing fears Pyongyang had exploded another nuclear bomb just weeks after its last one.

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) measured the quake at 2.9 magnitude with a depth of 5 km and added it could not conclusively confirm its nature.

It was the latest in a string of aftershocks following North Korea's sixth nuclear test on Sept. 3, which caused a 6.3 magnitude earthquake, according to the USGS. These have prompted experts and observers to suspect the last test may have destabilized the mountainous location.

All six nuclear tests have been carried out in this location in the northwest tip of the country. According to 38 North, a Washington-based project which monitors North Korea, numerous landslides throughout the nuclear test site have been detected via satellite images after the sixth test.

These disturbances are more numerous and widespread than seen after any of the North's previous tests, 38 North has said.

(Reporting by Christine Kim; Editing by James Dalgleish)

Carter volunteers to help solve tensions with North Korea .
Former President Jimmy Carter says he is open to working with President Trump to solve the growing tensions between the U.S. and North Korea. In an interview with The New York Times' Maureen Dowd, Carter said he would go to the country to work on negotiations. "I would go, yes," Carter said. He pointed to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's unpredictability as a major reason why diplomacy was so necessary."I'm afrIn an interview with The New York Times' Maureen Dowd, Carter said he would go to the country to work on negotiations.

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