World North Korea Tells Europeans Its Nukes Meant To Deter U.S.

23:36  08 november  2017
23:36  08 november  2017 Source:   Newsweek

U.S. welcomes China, South Korea bid to improve ties despite anti-missile dispute

  U.S. welcomes China, South Korea bid to improve ties despite anti-missile dispute The U.S. State Department welcomed a decision by China and South Korea on Tuesday to resume normal ties after a year-long standoff over a decision by Seoul and Washington to deploy a missile defense system to counter North Korea's nuclear program."We ... were pleased to hear that the Republic of Korea, that our Korean friends, and also the Chinese are forging a closer relationship," State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert told a briefing. "We see that as providing better stability ... for a region that desperately needs it because of North Korea.

North Korea responded Wednesday to European concerns about being in the path of Pyongyang’s potentially nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) by assuring the leader of Western military alliance NATO that such weapons were only intended for the U . S .

Trusted by over 40,000 readers. North Korea , Nukes and Negotiations. They therefore decided to rush forward to complete a weapon that would threaten and deter the United States at North Korea was isolated, and in its mind, the U . S . was rampaging and toppling regimes of which it didn’t approve.

Missiles are paraded across Kim Il Sung Square during a military parade on April 15 in Pyongyang, North Korea. © Wong Maye-E Missiles are paraded across Kim Il Sung Square during a military parade on April 15 in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea responded Wednesday to European concerns about being in the path of Pyongyang's potentially nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) by assuring the leader of Western military alliance NATO that such weapons were only intended for the U.S.

NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg said during an interview last week with Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun that "Europe has also entered the (North Korean) missile range, and NATO member states are already in danger."

Fla. man named Donald takes middle name 'Trump'

  Fla. man named Donald takes middle name 'Trump' What's in a name? For 80-year-old Donald McGovern — a whole lot. The man from Tallahassee, Florida, shares a last name with a failed Democratic presidential candidate (George McGovern '72), was elated when a candidate (Donald Trump) with whom he shares a first name was elected as the 45th president of the United States. So much so that, days before Trump was sworn in, the retiree filed for a name change: He requested that his middle name, Charles, be changed to "Trump," making him Donald Trump McGovern "Because I totally, totally believe in the man," McGovern said about his intention behind the name change. "Because I totally believe in his forwardness." What's in a name?

Nukes + Nuttiness = Neanderthal Deterrence . Missiles on parade in Pyongyang, North Korea , April 15, 2017. And so the Americans took him out in 2003, on the hunch that his much-bragged-about WMD arsenal did not mean he had a bomb.

Instead of trying to get North Korea to give up its nuclear program, they argue that the US needs to shift to a different policy: containment. And, to hear the experts tell it, containment is a heck of a lot less dangerous than what America is doing right now. Give deterrence a chance.

North Korea's ruling party-run Rodong Shinmun newspaper countered these claims, calling Stoltenberg's remarks "false and groundless" because, although European states are indeed in North Korea's missile range, Pyongyang has no intention of pulling the trigger.

"The DPRK's ballistic rockets are for deterring the U.S. nuclear war hysterics and ensuring peace and security on the Korean peninsula and the region. They are not for threatening Europe and the world," the commentary read, according to the official Korean Central News Agency, referring to the country's official title: The Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

"It is not the DPRK alone that has ICBM in the earth. If what Stoltenberg said is true, the countries with ICBM should naturally be a threat to Europe as it is within their range," it added.

Rex Tillerson: Sanctions are hurting North Korea

  Rex Tillerson: Sanctions are hurting North Korea Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Thursday that the US and China are seeing "certain signs" that international sanctions imposed against North Korea are beginning to impact the country's economy. "It is creating some stress within North Korea's economy," Tillerson said, pointing to US and Chinese intelligence.

Answer— 0 Does that mean North Korea needs nuclear weapons to deter US aggression? That’ s how Washington fights its wars: “Kill ’em all and let God sort it out.” This is why the North is building nukes instead making concessions; it ’ s because Washington is bent on either victory or annihilation.

North Korea developed nukes to deter the U . S . from attacking North Korea . Even absent U . S ., European and Russian competition, China would never be able to dominate its neighbors the way the U . S . has dominated the Western Hemisphere.

The article went on to accuse Stoltenberg of potentially "trying to curry favor with the U.S. to prolong his remaining days," but promptly warned that history showed "liars do not last long."

While NATO includes as many as 29 members across Europe and North America, the U.S. has been by far its greatest financial and military contributor since its establishment at the onset of the Cold War in 1949.

While NATO has traditionally poised itself for war with Russia, rapid advancements made to North Korea's military ordered by leader Kim Jong Un have placed most of the world within the trajectory of the reclusive state's arsenal. North Korea has long argued it does not seek to attack first, but has developed ballistic and nuclear weapons to discourage the U.S. from attempting to overthrow Kim's dynasty.

The U.S. and many of its allies, however, have rejected this line of thinking and demanded North Korea surrender its nuclear stockpile, a standoff that's gotten increasingly tense since President Donald Trump took on the task of handling the crisis earlier this year. Trump has taken a particularly aggressive stance toward his rival and has answered in kind to North Korea's fiery promises of destruction.

U.S. Troops Would Be 'Outnumbered' in Korea War

  U.S. Troops Would Be 'Outnumbered' in Korea War <p>If a conflict between North Korea and the United States suddenly broke out, U.S. troops in South Korea would be "outnumbered" and undersupplied, warns Lt. Gen. Jan-Marc Jouas, the former deputy commander of U.S. Forces in Korea.</p>"The 28,500 U.S. Armed Forces personnel in South Korea are vastly outnumbered by North Korean forces, as well as [South Korean] forces that will conduct the overwhelming majority of the fighting. Unlike every conflict since the last Korean War, we will not be able to build up our forces prior to the start of hostilities," Jouas wrote in a November 7 letter obtained by Newsweek to several Democratic members of Congress.

no connect. Kim Jong Un’s North Korea nuclear threat is real. But it ’ s not nuking the U . S

In response, U . S . Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers escorted by fighter jets flew in international airspace over waters east of North Korea on September 23. The flight was the farthest north of the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea that any U . S

During his first presidential tour of Asia, Trump was set to make a surprise visit on Wednesday to the heavily fortified demilitarized zone that has formed the border between North Korea and U.S.-backed South Korea since a 1953 armistice ended a bloody three-year conflict between the neighbors. The visit was canceled because of inclement weather. During a press conference in Seoul, Trump urged Kim to "make a deal."

A spokesperson for the German Foreign Ministry implored North Korea to heed the U.S. president's advice out of concern that Trump's foreign policy had become "unpredictable," Reuters reported.

The US military tweeted out bad information about its nukes. North Korea will notice. .
<p>And it couldn’t come at a worse time.</p>On Wednesday afternoon, it tweeted a link to an article falsely claiming that the US maintains “secret silos” for its nuclear warheads, and has “B-1 bombers that can drop them from the air.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!